English Department

Chair: Patricia Wallace,Chair: Susan Zlotnick; Adjunct Assistant Professor: Joanne T. Long; Professors: Mark C. Amodio, Beth Darlington, Robert DeMaria, Don Foster, Michael Joycea, Paul Kane, Amitava Kumar, Paul Russella, Ronald Sharp, Patricia Wallace; Associate Professors: Peter Antelyesb,Heesok Chang, Leslie C. Dunna, Wendy Graham, Jean M Kanea, Everett Kennedy Weedin, Jr., Susan Zlotnick; Assistant Professors: Eve Dunbar, Hua Hsu, Dorothy Kim, Kiese Laymon, Zoltán Márkus, Molly S. McGlennenb, Julie Parka, Hiram Perez, Tyrone Simpson II, Laura YowbAdjunct Associate Professors: Dean Crawford, M. Mark, Judith Nichols; Visiting Associate Professors: David Means, Karen Robertson; Adjunct Assistant Professor: Joshua Harmon; Lecturer: Nancy Willard.

Requirements for Concentration: Requirements for Concentration: A minimum of twelve units, comprising either eleven graded units and an ungraded senior tutorial, or twelve graded units. Four units must be elected at the 300-level, including at minimum one taken in the senior year. No AP credit or course taken NRO may be counted toward the requirements for the major.

Distribution Requirements: Majors are required to take two units of work in literature written before 1800 and one unit of work in literature written before 1900.

They must also take one course that focuses on issues of race, gender, sexuality, or ethnicity.

These courses must be taken at either the 200- or 300-level.

Recommendations: English 101 and 170 are strongly recommended as foundational courses, and students are also strongly encouraged to work from the 200 to the 300-level in at least one field of study. Acquaintance with a classical language (Latin or Greek) or with one or more of the languages especially useful for an understanding of the history of English (Old English, German, or French) is useful, as are appropriate courses in philosophy, history, and other literatures.

Further information: Applicants for English 209-210 (Narrative Writing), English 211-212 (Verse Writing), and English 305-306 (Senior Composition), must submit samples of their writing before spring break. Details about these deadlines, departmental procedures, and current information on course offerings may be found in the Alphabet Book available in the department office or online at the department website.

Correlate Sequences in English: The department offers seven correlates in English. Race and Ethnicity; Literary Theory and Cultural Studies; Poetry and Poetics; Literary Forms; British Literary History; American Literary History and Creative Writing. Further information is in the Alphabet Book as well.

I. Introductory

101a or b. The Art of Reading and Writing (1)

Development of critical reading in various forms of literary expression, and regular practice in different kinds of writing. The content of each section varies; see the Freshman Handbook for descriptions. The department.

Open only to freshmen; satisfies college requirement for a Freshman Writing Seminar.

Although the content of each section varies, this course may not be repeated for credit; see the Freshman Handbook for descriptions.

110b. Process, Prose, and Pedagogy (1)

(Same as College Course 110b)

170a or b. Approaches to Literary Studies (1)

Each section explores a central issue, such as "the idea of a literary period," "canons and the study of literature," "nationalism and literary form," or "gender and genre" (contact the department office for 2010/11 descriptions). Assignments focus on the development of skills for research and writing in English, including the use of secondary sources and the critical vocabulary of literary study. The department.

Open to freshmen and sophomores, and to others by permission; does not satisfy college requirement for a Freshman Writing Seminar.

177a or b. Special Topic: (1/2)

The Great White Whale: Herman Melville's Moby Dick, by Herman Melville. In the context of supporting readings that range from the biographical to the ecological, we explore the myriad complexities of this elusive novel, which was hailed in its time as both "extraordinary" and as "trash belonging to the worst school of Bedlam literature." If you've ever wanted the chance to read this magnificent tome and lavish some time and attention on it, this is the course for you. Ms. Friedman.

178. Chinatown Stories (1/2)

179. Special Topic: Henry David Thoreau (1/2)

(Same as Environmental Studies 179a) Thoreau's writings have deeply influenced American culture, including artistic, political, and environmental thought of the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries. Works studied include Thoreau's account, in Walden, of his famous "experiment in living"; his influential treatise "Civil Disobedience" and his writings opposing slavery; travel works such as The Maine Woods and Cape Cod; and his lifelong journal. Areas of consideration include the origins of Thoreau's thought in Emersonian Transcendentalism; his relation to the new sciences of his day; his role in formulating modern environmental thought; his influence on twentieth-century public figures such as Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr.; and his profound and diverse influence on different forms of modern and contemporary American literature.

II. Intermediate

205a or b. Composition (1)

Study and practice of various forms of prose and poetry. Reading and writing assignments may include prose fiction, journals, poetry, drama, and essays. The a-term course is open by special permission to sophomores regardless of major, in order of draw numbers, and to juniors and seniors, in order of draw numbers, with priority given to English majors. The b-term course is open by special permission to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, in order of draw numbers, with priority given to English majors. To gain special permission, students must fill out a form in the English department office during pre-registration.

One 2-hour period and individual conferences with the instructor.

206a or b. Composition (1)

Open to any student who has taken English 205 or an equivalent course.

Special permission is not required.

One 2-hour period and individual conferences with the instructor.

207b. Literary Nonfiction (1)

Study and practice of literary nonfiction in various formats. Reading and writing assignments may include personal, informal, and lyric essays, travel and nature writing; and memoirs. Frequent short writing assignments. Ms. Mark.

One 2-hour period and individual conferences with the instructor.

208. Literary Nonfiction (1)

Development of the student's abilities as a reader and writer of literary nonfiction, with emphasis on longer forms. Ms. Mark.

Prerequisite: open to students who have taken any of the other 200-level writing courses in English or by permission of the instructor.

One 2-hour course and individual conferences with the instructor.

209a. Narrative Writing (1)

Development of the student's abilities as a writer and reader of narrative, with particular emphasis on the short story. Mr. Kumar.

Year-long course, 209-210.

Deadline for submission of writing samples is before spring break.

One 2-hour period and individual conferences with the instructor.

210b. Narrative Writing (1)

Development of the student's abilities as a writer and reader of narrative, with particular emphasis on the short story. Mr. Kumar.

Year-long course, 209-210.

Deadline for submission of writing samples is before spring break.

One 2-hour period and individual conferences with the instructor.

211a. Verse Writing (1)

Development of the student's abilities as a writer and reader of poetry. Ms. Wallace.

Year-long course, 211-212.

Deadline for submission of writing samples is before spring break.

One 2-hour period and individual conferences with the instructor.

212b. Verse Writing (1)

Development of the student's abilities as a writer and reader of poetry. Ms. Wallace.

Year-long course, 211-212.

Deadline for submission of writing samples is before spring break.

One 2-hour period and individual conferences with the instructor.

213b. The English Language (1)

Study of the history of English from the fifth century to the present, with special attention to the role of literature in effecting as well as reflecting linguistic change. Treatment of peculiarly literary matters, such as poetic diction, and attention to broader linguistic matters, such as phonology, comparative philology, semantics, and the relationship between language and experience. Mr. Amodio.

215a. Pre-modern Drama: Text and Performance before 1800 (1)

Study of selected dramatic texts and their embodiment both on the page and the stage. Authors, critical and theoretical approaches, dramatic genres, historical coverage, and themes may vary from year to year. Ms. Dunn.

216b. Modern Drama: Text and Performance after 1800 (1)

Study of modern dramatic texts and their embodiment both on the page and the stage. Authors, critical and theoretical approaches, dramatic genres, historical coverage, and themes may vary from year to year.

Topic for 2010/11: 20th Century American Drama: Dysfunctional Families. This course explores modern plays that present debacles in the private sphere and its most widely accepted, codified, and institutionalized social manifestation: the family. As a site of incessant conflicts and negotiations between the individual and the other and between the intimate and the public, the family offers an ideal framework and subject matter for commentary on a variety of issues. Through an overview of 20th century American drama, this course pays particular attention to the vestiges of the American Dream in a range of dramatic representations of dysfunctional families. As a survey with a special focus, the course may include plays by Thornton Wilder, Eugene O'Neill, Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Lorraine Hansberry, Edward Albee, Sam Shepard, August Wilson, David Mamet, Wendy Wasserstein, David Henry Hwang, Tony Kushner, and Suzan-Lori Park. Mr. Markus.

Two 75-minute meetings.

217b. Literary Theory and Interpretation (1)

A study of various critical theories and practices ranging from antiquity to the present day, including Plato, Aristotle, Dr. Johnson, Matthew Arnold, formalism, psychoanalytic criticism, Marxist criticism, feminist criticism, deconstruction, new historicism, and cultural studies. Mr. Sharp

218a. Literature, Gender, and Sexuality (1)

(Same as Women's Studies 218) This course considers matters of gender and sexuality in literary texts, criticism, and theory. The focus varies from year to year, and may include study of a historical period, literary movement, or genre; constructions of masculinity and femininity; sexual identities; or representations of gender in relation to race and class. Topic for 2010/11a: Queer of Color Critique. This course considers what interventions the construction "queer of color" makes possible for queer theory, LGBT scholarship and activism, and different models of ethnic studies. We will assess the value and limitations of queer theory's "subjectless critique" in doing cultural and political work. What kind of complications (or contradictions) does the notion "queer of color" present for subjectless critique? How might queer of color critique inform political organizing? Particular attention is devoted to how "queer" travels. Toward this end, students determine what conflicts are presently shaping debates around sexuality in their own communities and consider how these debates may be linked to different regional, national or transnational politics. Throughout the semester, we evaluate what queer means and what kind of work it enables. Is it an identity or an anti-identity? A verb, a noun, an adjective? An analytic mode or a kind of literacy? Mr. Perez.

222a. Founding of English Literature (1)

These courses, English 222 and 223, offer an introduction to British literary history through an exploration of texts from the eighth through the seventeenth centuries in their literary and cultural contexts. English 222 begins with Old English literature and continues through the death of Queen Elizabeth I (1603). English 223 begins with the establishment of Great Britain and continues through the British Civil War and Puritan Interregnum to the Restoration. Critical issues may include discourses of difference (race, religion, gender, social class); tribal, ethnic, and national identities; exploration and colonization; textual transmission and the rise of print culture; authorship and authority. Both courses address the formation and evolution of the British literary canon, and its significance for contemporary English studies. Ms. Kim.

223b. Founding of English Literature (1)

These courses, English 222 and 223, offer an introduction to British literary history through an exploration of texts from the eighth through the seventeenth centuries in their literary and cultural contexts. English 222 begins with Old English literature and continues through the death of Queen Elizabeth I (1603). English 223 begins with the establishment of Great Britain and continues through the British Civil War and Puritan Interregnum to the Restoration. Critical issues may include discourses of difference (race, religion, gender, social class); tribal, ethnic, and national identities; exploration and colonization; textual transmission and the rise of print culture; authorship and authority. Both courses address the formation and evolution of the British literary canon, and its significance for contemporary English studies. Mr. Markus.

225a. American Literature, Origins to 1865 (1)

Study of the main developments in American literature from its origins through the Civil War: including Native American traditions, exploration accounts, Puritan writings, captivity and slave narratives, as well as major authors from the eighteenth century (such as Edwards, Franklin, Jefferson, Rowson, and Brown) up to the mid-nineteenth century (Irving, Cooper, Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Fuller, Stowe, Thoreau, Douglass, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson). Mr. Kane.

226b. American Literature, 1865-1925 (1)

Study of the major developments in American literature and culture from the late nineteenth to the early twentieth century. Literary movements such as realism, naturalism, regionalism, and modernism are examined, as well as literatures of ethnicity, race, and gender. Works studied are drawn from such authors as Twain, Howells, James, Jewett, Chestnutt, Chopin, Crane, London, Harte, DuBois, Gilman, Adams, Wharton, Dreiser, Pound, Eliot, Stein, Yezierska, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, O'Neill, Frost, H. D., and Toomer. Mr. Simpson.

227. The Harlem Renaissance and its Precursors (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 227) This course places the Harlem Renaissance in literary historical perspective as it seeks to answer the following questions: In what ways was "The New Negro" new? How did African American writers of the Harlem Renaissance rework earlier literary forms from the sorrow songs to the sermon and the slave narrative? How do the debates that raged during this period over the contours of a black aesthetic trace their origins to the concerns that attended the entry of African Americans into the literary public sphere in the eighteenth century? Ms. Dunbar.

228. African American Literature, "Vicious Modernism" and Beyond (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 228b) In the famous phrase of Amiri Baraka, "Harlem is vicious/ Modernism." Beginning with the modernist innovations of African American writers after the Harlem Renaissance, this course ranges from the social protest fiction of the 1940s through the Black Arts Movement to the postmodernist experiments of contemporary African American writers. Ms. Dunbar.

229a. Asian-American Literature, 1946-present (1)

This course considers such topics as memory, identity, liminality, community, and cultural and familial inheritance within Asian-American literary traditions. May consider Asian-American literature in relation to other ethnic literatures. Mr. Hsu.

230b. Latina and Latino Literature in the U.S. (1)

(Same as Latin American and Latino/a Studies 230b) This literature engages a history of conflict, resistance, and mestizaje. For some understanding of this embattled context, we examine transnational migration, exile, assimilation, bilingualism, and political and economic oppression as these variously affect the means and modes of the texts under consideration. At the same time, we emphasize the invented and hybrid nature of Latina and Latino literary and cultural traditions, and investigate the place of those inventions in the larger framework of American intellectual and literary traditions, on the one hand, and pan-Latinidad, on the other. Authors studied may include Americo Paredes, Piri Thomas, Cherrie Moraga, Richard Rodriguez, Michelle Serros, Cristina Garcia, Ana Castillo, and Junot Diaz. Mr. Perez.

231. Native American Literature (1)

Drawing from a wide range of traditions, this course explores the rich heritage of Native American literature. Material for study may comprise oral traditions (myths, legends, place naming and story telling) as well as contemporary fiction, non-fiction and poetry. Authors may include Zitkala Sa, Black Elk, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Silko, Louise Erdrich, Simon Ortiz, Sherman Alexie, and Joy Harjo. Ms. McGlennen.

235a. Old English (1)

Introduction to Old English language and literature. Mr. Amodio.

236b. Beowulf (1)

Intensive study of the early English epic in the original language. Mr. Amodio.

Prerequisite: English 235 or demonstrated knowledge of Old English, or permission of the instructor.

237a. Chaucer (1)

The major poetry, including The Canterbury Tales. Ms. Kim.

238b. Middle English Literature (1)

Studies in late medieval literature (1250-1500), drawing on the works of the Gawain-poet, Langland, Chaucer, and others. Genres studied may include lyric, romance, drama, allegory, and vision. Topic for 2010/11b: Arthurian Literature in Medieval Britain. In 1191, the Glastonbury monks purportedly found the remains of King Arthur and Guenevere. They proceeded to publish their discovery and invited "reliable" witnesses (in the figure of Gerald of Wales) to come and experience the exhumation. The Glastonbury monks could funnel this find into a potentially large money-making venture for the monastery as the future site of an Arthurian pilgrimage. For the Norman royal house, this meant that they could use this find to squash any potential and future Welsh rebellion. Gerald of Wales writes up his account of this momentous exhumation and this is one of the many pieces of Arthurian literature that we will be looking at in this class. This class will consider how Arthurian material becomes part of the political and religious rhetoric used to secure a sense of what constitutes medieval Britain and who should control it.

This class will examine the beginnings and rapid spread of Arthurian materials from Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Brittaniae to Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. We will move from historiography and chronicle to romance and lai, in both prose and verse. We will begin in the twelfth century and finish at the end of the fifteenth century with the Winchester Malory and Caxton's printed version of Malory's work. We will be reading materials from Latin, Middle Welsh, Anglo-Norman French, Middle Scots, and Middle English texts. Some of the texts we will examine: Geoffrey of Monmouth, Historia Regum Brittaniae; La3amon's Brut; Marie de France's Lanval; Chrétien de Troyes' Yvain, Perceval, Lancelot; Cullhwch and Olwen; The Dream of Rhonabwy; the Welsh Peredur and Ywain; the Welsh Triads; Of Arthour and Merlin, The Stanzaic Morte Arthure; The Alliterative Morte Arthure; Prose Tristan; The Awntyrs of Arther; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Lancelot of the Laik and Sir Tristem; and Malory's Le Morte Darthur.

Ms. Kim.

240a or b. Shakespeare (1)

Study of some representative comedies, histories, and tragedies. Ms. Dunn, Ms. Robertson, Mr. Weedin.

Not open to students who have taken English 241-242.

241a. Shakespeare (1)

(Same as Drama 241-242) Study of a substantial number of the plays, roughly in chronological order, to permit a detailed consideration of the range and variety of Shakespeare's dramatic art. Mr. Foster.

Year-long course, 241-242.

Not open to students who have taken English 240.

242b. Shakespeare (1)

(Same as Drama 241-242) Study of a substantial number of the plays, roughly in chronological order, to permit a detailed consideration of the range and variety of Shakespeare's dramatic art. Mr. Foster.

Year-long course, 241-242.

Not open to students who have taken English 240.

245b. Pride and Prejudice: British Literature from 1640-1745 (1)

Study of various authors who were influential in defining the literary culture and the meaning of authorship in the period. Authors may include Aphra Behn, John Dryden, Anne Finch, John Gay, Eliza Haywood, Mary Leapor, Katherine Philips, Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. Mr. DeMaria.

246b. Sense and Sensibility: British Literature from 1745-1798 (1)

Study of the writers who represented the culmination of neoclassical literature in Great Britain and those who built on, critiqued, or even defined themselves against it. Authors may include Samuel Johnson, James Boswell, Edmund Burke, William Beckford, William Cowper, Olaudah Equiano, Hester Thrale Piozzi, Mary Wollstonecraft, Ann Radcliffe, Anne Yearsley, and Hannah More. Ms. Park.

247b. Eighteenth-Century British Novels (1)

Readings vary but include works by such novelists as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, and Austen. Ms. Park.

248b. The Age of Romanticism, 1789-1832 (1)

Study of British literature in a time of revolution. Authors may include such poets as Blake, Wordsworth, and Keats; essayists such as Burke, Wollstonecraft, Hazlitt, Lamb, and DeQuincey; and novelists such as Edgeworth, Austen, Mary Shelley, and Scott. Mr. Sharp.

249a. Victorian Literature: Culture and Anarchy (1)

Study of Victorian culture through the prose writers of the period. This course explores the strategies of nineteenth-century writers who struggled to find meaning and order in a changing world. It focuses on such issues as industrialization, the woman question, imperialism, aestheticism, and decadence, paying particular attention to the relationship between literary and social discourses. Authors may include nonfiction prose writers such as Carlyle, Ruskin, Arnold, Pater, and Wilde as well as fiction writers such as Disraeli, Gaskell, Dickens, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, George Eliot, and Arthur Conan Doyle. Ms. Graham.

250. Victorian Poets: Eminent, Decadent, and Obscure (1)

A study of Romantic impulses and Victorian compromises as expressed in the major poems of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and Swinburne. The second half of the course turns from economies of the aesthetic to material conditions of the literary marketplace and to challenges met and posed by women writers such as Felicia Hemans, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Emily Brontë, Christina Rossetti, Michael Field (Katherine Bradley and Edith Cooper), and Alice Meynell. Some preliminary study of romantic poetry is strongly recommended. Mr. Kane.

251. Topics in Black Literatures (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 251) This course considers Black literatures in all their richness and diversity. The focus changes from year to year, and may include study of a historical period, literary movement, or genre. The course may take a comparative, diasporic approach or may examine a single national or regional literature. Ms. Yow.

252. Writing the Diaspora: Verses/Versus (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 252b) This semester's Writing the Diaspora class concerns itself with close textual analysis of hip hop texts through the lens of contestation. Black American cultural expression is anchored in rhetorical battles and verbal jousts that place one character against another. From sorrow songs to blues, black music has always been a primary means of cultural expression for African Americans, particularly during difficult social periods and transition. Is Imani Perry right in claiming that Hip Hop is Black American music, not diasporic or Afro-Atlantic music? Instead of looking at established rivalries, we will look to become the bridge between many artists who never dissed each other. How are artists like Eminem, Nas and Jean Grae speaking to one another? What about Lil Kim and Geto Boys? Mos Def, MC Lyte, KRS-One and Lauryn Hill? What are they saying? How are they saying it? What do geography, gender, politics, multiculturalism and "knowledge of self" really have to do with Hip Hop and the nation? And, in the spirit of hip hop, how do you convey what texts and artists are ultimately most effective, most persuasive. Where do you find meaning and how do you articulate that journey? Mr. Laymon.

With special permission of the instructor.

255a. Nineteenth-Century British Novels (1)

Readings vary but include works by such novelists as Scott, Dickens, Thackeray, the Brontës, Trollope, George Eliot, and Hardy. Ms. Zlotnick.

256. Modern British and Irish Novels (1)

Significant twentieth-century novels from Great Britain and Ireland. Ms. Rumbarger.

257. The Novel in English after 1945 (1)

The novel in English as it has developed in Africa, America, Australia, Canada, the Caribbean, Great Britain, India, Ireland, and elsewhere. Mr. Crawford.

260a. Modern British Literature, 1901-1945 (1)

Study of representative modern works of literature in relation to literary modernism. Consideration of cultural crisis and political engagement, with attention to the Great War as a subject of memoir, fiction, and poetry, and to the new voices of the thirties and early forties. Authors may include Hardy, Yeats, Eliot, Lawrence, Woolf, Conrad, Graves, Vera Brittain, Rebecca West, Orwell, and Auden. Mr. Chang.

261. Literatures of Ireland (1)

Authors, genres, themes and historical coverage may vary from year to year. Readings may range from the Táin Bó Cuailnge (Cattle Raid of Cooley) and other sagas; to Anglo-Irish authors of various periods, including Swift, Goldsmith, Thomas Moore, Maria Edgeworth, George Bernard Shaw and Oscar Wilde; to the writers of the Irish literary revival, including Roger Casement, Lady Gregory, Padraic O'Conaire, Pádraig Mac Piarais, Synge, and Yeats; to modernists Joyce, Beckett, Flann O'Brien, and Elizabeth Bowen; to contemporary Irish poets, novelists, dramatists, and musicians. Ms. Kane.

262a. Postcolonial Literatures (1)

Study of contemporary literature written in English from Africa, Australia, Canada, the Caribbean, the Indian subcontinent and elsewhere. Readings in various genres by such writers as Chinua Achebe, Margaret Atwood, Janet Frame, Nadine Gordimer, V. S. Naipaul, Salman Rushdie, Derek Walcott, Patrick White. Some consideration of post-colonial literary theory.

Topic for 2010a: Australian Literature. Includes works by Henry Lawson, David Malouf, Judith Wright, Les Murray, Patrick White, Alex Miller, Gwen Harwood, Alex Miller, Helen Garner, Richard Flanagan, Oodgeroo Noonucca, Peter Carey, and Alice Pung. Mr. Sharp.

Two 75-minute meetings.

265a or b. Selected Author (1)

Study of the work of a single author. The work may be read in relation to literary predecessors and descendants as well as in relation to the history of the writer's critical and popular reception. This course alternates from year to year with English 365. Mr. Weedin (a), Ms. Zlotnick (b). 

Topic for 2010/11a: Wallace Stevens.

Topic for 2010/11b: Jane Austen.

275. Caribbean Discourse (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 275) Study of the work of artists and intellectuals from the Caribbean. Analysis of fiction, non-fiction, and popular cultural forms such as calypso and reggae within their historical contexts. Attention to cultural strategies of resistance to colonial domination and to questions of community formation in the post-colonial era. May include some discussion of post-colonial literary theory and cultural studies.

277. Sea-Changes: Caribbean Rewritings of the British Canon (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 277) From William Shakespeare's The Tempest to James Joyce's Ulysses, the classic texts of the British literary canon have served as points of departure for Caribbean writers seeking to establish a dialogue between a colonial literary tradition and post-colonial national literatures. This course addresses the many re-writings of British texts by Caribbean authors from Roberto Fernandez Retamar's Caliban to Jamaica Kincaid's The Autobiography of My Mother. Texts may include Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea, V.S. Naipaul's Guerillas, Micelle Cliff's Abeng and No Telephone to Heaven, Maryse Conde's Windward Heights, and Riosario Ferre's Sweet Diamond Dust. Ms. Yow.

280b. Naked Cities (1)

An introduction to city fictions and images from the 1890s to the 1990s. This course explores a broadly chronological series of representations of the city, considering exemplary texts from literature and also from cinema, photography and television. From stark depictions of urban poverty to spectacular visions of futuristic metropolises, the city and city dwellers have been persistent subjects of twentieth-century media. The module focuses on shifts in critical understanding of the city, considering the ways in which such understanding has reflected and contributed to the changing visions of authors, filmmakers and television producers. Readings may include George Gissing, Robert Louis Stevenson, Henry Roth, Nathanael West, Raymond Chandler, Thomas Pynchon, and others. Screenings may include Fantômas (Louis Feuillade, 1913), Berlin: Symphony of a Great City (Walter Ruttmann, 1927); The Big Sleep (Howard Hawks, 1946); On the Town (Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly, 1949); Playtime (Jacques Tati, 1962); Bringing out the Dead (Scorsese, 1999). Mr. Kember

281b. Writing Immigrant Narrative (1/2)

(Same as Drama and Women's Studies 281).

290a or b. Field Work (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite: 2 units of 200-level work in English, and by permission of the associate chair. 1 unit of credit given only in exceptional cases.

298a or b. Independent Study (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite: 2 units of 200-level work in English, and by permission of the associate chair. 1 unit of credit given only in exceptional cases.

III. Advanced

300a or b. Senior Tutorial (1)

Preparation of a long essay (40 pages) or other independently designed critical project. Each essay is directed by an individual member of the department.

Special permission.

302b. Adaptations (1)

(Same as College Course and Media Studies 302) If works of art continue each other, as Virginia Woolf suggested, then cultural history accumulates when generations of artists think and talk together across time. What happens when one of those artists radically changes the terms of the conversation by switching to another language, another genre, another mode or medium? What constitutes a faithful adaptation? In this course we briefly consider the biological model and then explore analogies across a wide range of media. We begin with Metamorphoses, Ovid's free adaptations of classical myths, and follow Medea and Orpheus through two thousand years of theater (from Euripides to Anouilh, Williams, and Durang); paintings (Greek vases and Pompeian walls to Dürer, Rubens, Poussin, Denis, and Klee); film and television (Pasolini, von Trier, Cocteau, Camus); dance (Graham, Balanchine, Noguchi, Bausch); music (Cavalli, Charpentier, Milhaud, Barber, Stravinsky, Birtwistle, Glass); narratives and graphic narratives (Woolf, Moraga, Pynchon, Gaiman); verse (Rilke, Auden, Milosz); and computer games (Mutants and Masterminds, Fate/stay night). We may also analyze narratives and graphic narratives by Clowes, Collins, Ishiguro, Groening, Joyce, Lahiri, Malcolm X, Mann, Millhauser, Nabokov, Pekar, Shakespeare, Spiegelman, Swift, Tanizaki, and Wilde; films by Bharadwaj, Berman/Pucini, Camus, Dangarembga, Ichikawa, Ivory, Kubrick, Kurosawa, Lee, Lyne, Mendes, Nair, Sembene, Visconti, and Zwigoff-, remixes by DJ Spooky and Danger Mouse; sampling; cover bands, tribute bands; Wikipedia, wikicomedy, wikiality; and of course Adaptation, Charlie and Donald Kaufman's screenplay for Spike Jonze's film, based very very loosely on Susan Orlean's Orchid Thief. Ms. Mark.

By special permission.

305a. Composition (1)

Advanced study and practice of various forms of prose and poetry. Open in the senior year to students concentrating in English. Deadline for submission of writing samples immediately before spring break. Mr. Laymon.

Year-long course, 305-306.

306b. Composition (1)

Advanced study and practice of various forms of prose and poetry. Open in the senior year to students concentrating in English. Deadline for submission of writing samples immediately before spring break. Mr. Laymon.

Year-long course, 305-306.

307b. Senior Writing Seminar (1)

An advanced writing course in parallel with the long-established senior composition sequence, accommodating the multiple approaches, genres, forms and interests that represent the diversity of a contemporary writing life. Mr. Joyce.

315. Studies in Poetry (1)

Advanced study of selected topics in the history and theory of poetry, exploring a range of interpretive contexts for understanding individual poems. Discussions may consider such issues as the poetic canon, attacks on the defenses of poetry, and the boundaries of what constitutes poetry itself. The course includes both poetry and criticism, and may focus upon a particular period, genre, poet, or poetic tradition.

317a. Studies in Literary Theory (1)

Advanced study of problems and schools of literary criticism and theory, principally in the twentieth century. May include discussion of new criticism, structuralism, deconstruction, reader-response theory, new historicism, and Marxist, psychoanalytic, phenomenological, and feminist analysis. Mr. Simpson.

Topic for 2010/11: Critical Race Theory in American Literature and Culture: Unthinking Race in the Age of its Reconfiguration. Our first task in this course is to convince ourselves, truly, that racial identity is a social fiction that deceives us into believing that we can predict the propensities and acumen of a person by the mere evidence of her body's epidermal hue. Toward this end, we review Enlightenment philosophers and physicians such as Immanuel Kant, Johan Blumenbach, and Thomas Jefferson who canonized this mythology in Western thought. Our early interrogations will meditate on how these thinkers were able to do so. What ideological precepts made their arguments about race so rational and convincing? Once we explore how race as an idea has emerged and was then discredited, we analyze various aspects of American cultural production that demonstrate the unfortunate recalcitrance, if not, recrudescence of racial ideology. American fiction will provide the primary sites of analysis. After considering critical race theorists such as Ann Cheng, Linda Alcoff, Walter Mignolo,and Robyn Wiegman, we will turn our critical lenses upon the work of novelists such as Jean Toomer, William Faulkner, Julia Alvarez, Philip Roth, Danzy Senna, Chang-Rae Lee, Barack Obama, and W.E. B. Dubois. But our investigations will not end there. My hope is that this course will provide students witha critical arsenal that will enable them to discern how the ideology continues to saturate the social field, if not for the purposes of extending the mythos of racial identity, then certainly for the purposes of undermining it. Film, music, television programs and commercials, visual art, and the unpredictable rise of Barack Obama all supply sources where students may ferret out the distinguished legacy of racialist thought. Mr. Simpson.

319b. Race and Its Metaphors (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 319) Re-examinations of canonical literature in order to discover how race is either explicitly addressed by or implicitly enabling to the texts. Does racial difference, whether or not overtly expressed, prove a useful literary tool? The focus of the course varies from year to year. Ms. Dunbar.

Not offered in 2009/10.

320a. or b. Traditions in the Literature of England and America (1)

The course studies varied attempts by writers to imagine human conduct and speech that is heroic and yet not ridiculous in the time and landscape of the writer and the reader. The writers read may include Homer, Virgil, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Radcliffe, Austen, Twain, Faulkner, Cheever, and Angelou.

Topic for 2010/11a: Visions and Revisions of the Fall. In this class we consider the ways in which the Fall is treated as a literary, religious, and philosophical construct by John Milton in Paradise Lost and by Philip Pullman in his Dark Materials trilogy. While the course focuses on Milton's poem and Pullman's novels, we consider other versions of the Fall (including the Biblical one) and we also examine the lot/state/situation of the fallen (angels and others) by reading a variety of medieval and modern texts, which may include The Consolation of Philosophy, Pearl, Nineteen Eighty-Four, The Butcher Boy, andPostcards. In addition, we will screen a number of films, which may include The Devil's Advocate, The Rapture, Dogma, Pan's Labyrinth, and Bedazzled. Mr. Amodio.

Topic for 2010/11b: The Iliad and Its Transformations.

This seminar studies Homer's Iliad, one of the greatest and most influential works of the Western tradition, along with poetic reimaginings of the Iliad by Christopher Logue, Robert Graves, and Robert Lowell; seminal essays by Simone Weil and Rachel Bespaloff; and David Malouf's novel Ransom. Mr. Sharp.

One 2-hour seminar.

325a or b. Studies in Genre (1)

An intensive study of specific forms or types of literature, such as satire, humor, gothic fiction, realism, slave narratives, science fiction, crime, romance, adventure, short story, epic, autobiography, hypertext, and screenplay. Each year, one or more of these genres is investigated in depth. The course may cross national borders and historical periods or adhere to boundaries of time and place.

Topic for 2010/11a: Green Writing: Literature and the Environment. (Same as Environmental Studies 325) This course examines the development of environmental literature, from the "nature writing" of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to the emergence of contemporary ecocriticism. Readings will feature a wide range of writers from various disciplines, with a special emphasis on the literature of the Hudson River Valley. Some field trips included. Mr. Kane.

Topic for 2010/11b: Studies in Genre: Stages of Subversion. In this seminar we study drama's often complicit, sometimes subversive, relation to religious dogma, class privilege, bourgeois morality, racial prejudice, heteronormativity, patriarchal order, military adventurism, executive incompetence, state censorship, and conventional stupidity. We begin with liturgical drama of the fourteenth century, and end somewhere off-Broadway. Plays may include scripts by the Wakefield master, Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare, Aphra Behn, Bertolt Brecht, Samuel Beckett, James Baldwin, Christopher Durang, Jane Martin, David Mamet, and Carolyn Gage. Films may include Charlie Chaplin's Monseiur Verdoux, Lindsay Anderson's O Lucky Man, David Fincher's Fight Club, or James McTiegue's V for Vendetta. Coursework include critical exposition as well as original script-writing, and some performance. Mr. Foster.

One 2-hour period.

326b. Challenging Ethnicity (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 326b) An exploration of literary and artistic engagements with ethnicity. Contents and approaches vary from year to year. Topic for 2011/12b: Gay Harlem. This course explores Harlem’s role in the production of sexual modernity and in particular as a space of queer encounter. We consider what conditions may have increased opportunities for interclass and interethnic contact in Harlem and examine how such encounters helped to generate the sexual subcultures more commonly associated with other parts of Manhattan, such as Greenwich Village, Chelsea or Times Square. Although cultural production from the Harlem Renaissance feature centrally in our discussions, we also consider the longer history of Harlem, from slavery to the Great Migration and through to the present day, taking into special account the relationship of space to erotics. While much of our investigation is devoted to the intersection of race and sexuality in African American life, we also consider Harlem’s history as an Italian and a Puerto Rican neighborhood as well as its discrete micro-cosmopolitanism within the larger global city. Mr. Perez.

328b. Literature of the American Renaissance (1)

Intensive study of major works by American writers of the mid-nineteenth century. Authors may include: Cooper, Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, Douglass, Fuller, Stowe, Delany, Wilson, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson. In addition to placing the works in historical and cultural context, focusing on the role of such institutions as slavery and such social movements as transcendentalism, the course also examines the notion of the American Renaissance itself. Ms. Graham.

329a. American Literary Realism (1)

Exploration of the literary concepts of realism and naturalism focusing on the theory and practice of fiction between 1870 and 1910, the first period in American literary history to be called modern. The course may examine past critical debates as well as the current controversy over realism in fiction. Attention is given to such questions as what constitutes reality in fiction, as well as the relationship of realism to other literary traditions. Authors may include Henry James, Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, Charles Chestnutt, Edith Wharton, Theodore Dreiser, and Willa Cather. Topic for 2010/11:American Literary Realism Since its inception. American Literary Realism and Naturalism has paid particular attention to the historical currents of post-Civil War America (war, slavery, reconstruction), the closing of the frontier, rapid industrialization, new monetary instruments and technologies, the rise of the professional class, labor, demographic shifts (rural/urban; South/North), issues of race, class, gender, and the dominant ideologies that supported America's maturation into a super-power: Social Darwinism, the Gospel of Efficiency (new Protestant work ethic), Imperialism (new Manifest Destiny), pecuniary emulation, conspicuous consumption as well as the concomitant social costs of prosperity and progress: poverty, racism, neurasthenia. Students might assume from this brief introduction that a Ph.D. in American history is a prerequisite for the course; however, the period literature is itself a primary source for an overview of the relevant historical context. In Sister Carrie, Dreiser offers a general introduction to the new phenomenon, the department store, in case this innovation in one stop shopping should become obsolete by 1940. It is Dreiser's self-consciousness as a 'historian of the present' or Twain's revisionist, backward glance at slavery or Wharton's anxious account of the imminent extinction of the leisure class that forges the peculiar bond of form/content in such works. While the course focuses on genre, it has always reflected the diversity of 19th-century literature flying under the banners: Naturalism & Realism. Authors include: Henry and William James, Dreiser, Norris, Crane, Wharton, Twain, Chesnutt, Wright, and Ellison. Ms. Graham.

330a. American Modernism (1)

Intensive study of modern American literature and culture in the first half of the twentieth century, with special attention to the concept of "modernism" and its relation to other cultural movements during this period. Authors may include Dreiser, Wharton, Cather, Frost, Anderson, Millay, Pound, Stein, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, O'Neill, H. D., Faulkner, Wright, Eliot, Williams, Moore, Stevens, Crane, Yezierska, Toomer, Hughes, Cullen, Brown, Hurston, McKay, and Dos Passos. Mr. Antelyes.

331b. Post-modern American Literature (1)

Advanced study of American literature from the second half of the twentieth century to the present date. Authors may include Welty, Ellison, Warren, O'Connor, Olson, Momaday, Mailer, Lowell, Bellow, Percy, Nabokov, Bishop, Rich, Roth, Pynchon, Ashbery, Merrill, Reed, Silko, Walker, Morrison, Gass, and Kingston. Ms. Kane.

340b. Studies in Medieval Literature (1)

Intensive study of selected medieval texts and the questions they raise about their context and interpretation. Issues addressed may include the social and political dynamics, literary traditions, symbolic discourses, and individual authorial voices shaping literary works in this era. Discussion of these issues may draw on both historical and aesthetic approaches, and both medieval and modern theories of rhetoric, reference, and text-formation. Ms. Kim.

341b. Studies in the Renaissance (1)

(Same as Women's Studies 341) Intensive study of selected Renaissance texts and the questions they raise about their context and interpretation.

Topic for 2010/11b: Women and Performance in Early Modern England. Until recently, the focus of scholars and critics on the all-male theater of Shakespeare and his contemporaries obscured the roles played by early modern women in theatrical performance, not only as spectators and readers, but also as playwrights and actors. Similarly, the fact that no woman published her own compositions, or worked as a professional musician, obscured the importance of musical performance in many women’s lives. Early modern Englishwomen in fact had many spaces, both private and public, in which to perform, from the political stage on which Queen Elizabeth enacted female power, to the town squares where women dissenters preached, to the household rooms in which women practiced their instruments, sang psalms and madrigals, staged amateur theatricals, and wrote plays to be performed on what Margaret Cavendish called “my brain the stage.” In a more figurative sense, too, early modern women were constantly engaged in the performance of gender according to, or in defiance of, the “scripts” written for them in contemporary theological, legal, educational, and medical literature. This course draws on both historical research and contemporary feminist criticism to illumine the spaces of early modern women’s performance, with particular emphasis on how they were used re-imagine women’s social roles. Ms. Dunn.

342b. Studies in Shakespeare (1)

Advanced study of Shakespeare's work and its cultural significance in various contexts from his time to today.

Topic for 2010/11: Shakespeare Today. This course seeks answers to the question of what Shakespeare means in our contemporary culture. What is "Shakespeare" and, for that matter, what is "culture" today? How dead is the author if he is called Shakespeare? How has Shakespeare been made, rediscovered, and reinvented? The exceeding (and frequently uncritical) appreciation of Genius Shakespeare has been variously described as "Bardolatry", "Shakespeare cult", "Shakespeare fetish", and "Shakespeare myth." Our aim is to examine the history and the current effects of Shakespeare's distinguished cultural status. We begin by clarifying a few theoretical issues and exploring how this cultural icon has been constructed from Shakespeare's time to the present, after which we focus on specific Shakespeare plays contrasting their cultural significance and possible meanings in Shakespeare's time with their significance and meanings today. Four Shakespeare plays are at the center of our investigations: The Taming of the Shrew, The Merchant of Venice, Othello, and The Tempest. In this second part of the course, we will view a theater performance and pay special attention to stage and film adaptations as well as other cultural appropriations of these plays. Mr. Markus.

345a. Milton (1)

Study of John Milton's career as a poet and polemicist, with particular attention to Paradise Lost. Mr. DeMaria.

350b. Studies in Eighteenth-century British Literature (1)

Focuses on a broad literary topic, with special attention to works of the Restoration and eighteenth century: a consideration of the genre of satire as a way of understanding the world; or sensibility and the Gothic, a study of the origins of these literary trends and of their relationship to each other, with some attention to their later development. Mr. DeMaria.

351a. Studies in Nineteenth-Century British Literature (1)

Study of a major author (e.g., Coleridge, George Eliot, Oscar Wilde) or a group of authors (the Brontës, the Pre-Raphaelite poets and painters) or a topical issue (representations of poverty; literary decadence; domestic angels and fallen women; transformations of myth in Romantic and Victorian literature) or a major genre (elegy, epic, autobiography).

Topic for 2010/11a: The Bronte Sisters. The aim of this course is two-fold: a detailed study of the major works of Anne, Emily and Charlotte Bronte as well as an examination of the criticism that has been written about the sisters' novels and poems. We will acquaint ourselves with the different critical lenses through which the Bronte's have been viewed (e.g., biographical, feminist, historicist, postcolonial) in order to explore the ways in which the "meaning" of the Bronte sisters and their writing has changed over time. Primary texts include Jane Eyre, Shirley, Villette, Wuthering Heights, The Tenant of Wildfell Hallthe Brontes' poetry and Elizabeth Gaskell's Life of Charlotte Bronte. Ms. Zlotnick.

352a. Romantic Poets: Rebels with a Cause (1)

Intensive study of the major poetry and critical prose of Blake, Wordsworth, and Coleridge (English 352), and Byron, Shelley, and Keats (English 353) in the context of Enlightenment thought, the French Revolution, and the post-Napoleonic era. Readings may include biographies, letters, and a few philosophical texts central to the period. Some preliminary study of Milton is strongly recommended. Ms. Darlington.

353b. Romantic Poets: Rebels with a Cause (1)

Intensive study of the major poetry and critical prose of Blake, Wordsworth, and Coleridge (English 352), and Byron, Shelley, and Keats (English 353) in the context of Enlightenment thought, the French Revolution, and the post-Napoleonic era. Readings may include biographies, letters, and a few philosophical texts central to the period. Some preliminary study of Milton is strongly recommended. Ms. Darlington.

355b. Modern Poets (1)

Intensive study of selected modern poets, focusing on the period 1900-1945, with attention to longer poems and poetic sequences. Consideration of the development of the poetic career and of poetic movements. May include such poets as Auden, Bishop, Eliot, Frost, Hopkins, Moore, Pound, Stein, Stevens, Williams, and Yeats. Mr. Kane.

356a. Contemporary Poets (1)

Intensive study of selected contemporary poets, with attention to questions of influence, interrelations, and diverse poetic practices. May include such poets as Ashbery, Bernstein, Brooks, Graham, Harjo, Heaney, Hill, Merrill, Rich, and Walcott.

Topic for 2010/11a: The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Contemporary American Poetry. In our course, we look at how contemporary poets of color help define America through revolutionary literary tactics. What does it mean to be counter-cultural? How do we read and listen to poetry as an act of revolution, defiance, or means to wage war? How have poets of color re-worked genre (through conflating, exploding, and re-characterizing their poetry) in order to bring innovative understandings and expectations of ethnicity and race in America. We study a broad range of poets and literary criticism to help us analyze the use of poetry as a vehicle of social, political, and cultural transformation. We also study the way feminist and Indigenous lenses and sensibilities intersect with notions of revolution. Finally, we study literary criticism that will help us frame theoretical positions such as the Blacks Arts movement, the Native Renaissance, Women of Color analysis, and the spoken word movement. Ms. McGlennen.

357b. Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature (1)

Intensive study of literatures of the twentieth century, with primary focus on British and postcolonial (Irish, Indian, Pakistani, South African, Caribbean, Australian, Canadian, etc.) texts. Selections may focus on an author or group of authors, a genre (e.g., modern verse epic, drama, satiric novel, travelogue), or a topic (e.g., the economics of modernism, black Atlantic, Englishes and Englishness, themes of exile and migration).

Topic for 2010/2011b: James Joyce's Ulysses.

Mr. Russell.

362b. Text and Image (1)

Explores intersections and interrelationships between literary and visual forms such as the graphic novel, illustrated manuscripts, tapestry, the world-wide web, immersive environments, the history and medium of book design, literature and film, literature and visual art. Topics vary from year to year.

Topic for 2010/11b: Because Dave Chappelle Said So. (Same as Africana Studies 362) From Hip Hop to Paul Beatty's White Boy Shuffle to Spike Lee's Bamboozled to Dave Chappelle to Aaron McGruder's Boondocks to Sacha Baron Cohen's Ali G character, black masculinity seems to be a contemporary site of massive satire. This course explores the history, style, content and movement of black, mostly male, satirical comic narratives and characters. Using postmodernism as our critical lens, we explore what black satirical characters and narratives are saying through "tragicomedy" to the mediums of literature, film, television and comics, and to the ideals of morality, democracy, sexuality, femininity and masculinity. Are these narratives and characters, while asserting some sort of critical citizenship, actually writing black women's subjectivity, narratives and experience out of popular American textual history? Does satire have masculinist underpinnings? How are these texts and characters communicating with each other and is there a shared language? Is there a difference between a black comic text and a black satirical text? These are some of the questions we explore in "Because Dave Chappelle Said So." Mr. Laymon.

365a or b. Selected Author (1)

Study of the work of a single author. The work may be read in relation to literary predecessors and descendants as well as in relation to the history of the writer's critical and popular reception. This course alternates from year to year with English 265.

Topic for 2010/11a: J.D. Salinger and the Craft of Writing. This seminar focuses on the craft of writing in J.D. Salinger's work, including Catcher in the Rye, Nine Stories, Franny and Zooey, Raise High the Roofbeams and Hapworth 16, 1924. The course also explores Salinger's relation to social and literary movements of the 1950s, such as the Beats, and his influence on other writers, including those of the twenty-first century such as Jonathan Safran Foer and Aimee Bender. Of special interest to creative writers. Ms. Wallace.

Topic for 2010/11a, Mr. Russell: Proust. We will read substantial portions of Proust’s 3000 page masterwork In Search of Lost Time in the Moncrieff/Kilmartin translation. There will be some discussion of translation issues, but mostly we will focus on the architecture of the text and Proust’s contributions to modernism.

Topic for 2010/11a, Ms. Yow: William Faulkner.

369a. Major Third World Author: Fanon (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 369a).

Topic for 2010/11a:Fanon. This course provides the opportunity for an in-depth study of the life and works of Frantz Fanon. A psychiatrist, war hero, cultural critic, revolutionary, and one of the foremost philosophers of liberation of the decolonizing world, Fanon made his presence felt in a variety of intellectual and political arenas. We consider Fanon not only in the context of revolutionary anti-colonial politics, but also in relationship to discourses of race, psychoanalysis, colonial psychiatry and phenomenology. Feminist, postcolonial and cultural critical engagements with Fanon's work are central to our discussion of his enduring intellectual legacy. Ms. Yow.

One 2-hour meeting.

370a or b. Transnational Literature (1)

This course focuses on literary works and cultural networks that cross the borders of the nation-state. Such border-crossings raise questions concerning vexed phenomena such as globalization, exile, diaspora, and migration—forced and voluntary. Collectively, these phenomena deeply influence the development of transnational cultural identities and practices. Specific topics studied in the course vary from year to year and may include global cities and cosmopolitanisms; the black Atlantic; border theory; the discourses of travel and tourism; global economy and trade; or international terrorism and war.

Topic for 2011/12b: Black Paris. (Same as Africana Studies 370) This course examines the cultural productions of black writers and artists in the City of Light. Long considered a haven for African American artists, Paris also attracted (and repelled) African and Afro-Caribbean intellectuals as the metropolitan center of the French empire. Through an exploration of literature, music and film, we think about what Paris has represented in the transnational cultural and political circuits of the African diaspora. The site of the first Conference of Negro-African writers and Artists in 1956, the city provided a space for the development and negotiation of a diasporic consciousness. For James Baldwin, Paris was where he discovered “what it means to be an American.” Throughout the semester, we interrogate how the experiences of expatriation and exile complicate understandings of racial, national and transnational identities. Topics for discussion include modernism, jazz, Negritude, Pan-Africanism, and the Présence Africaine group. We consider the work of Josephine Baker, James Baldwin, Sidney Bechet, Bricktop, Aime Cesaire, Chester Himes, Langston Hughes, Andrea Lee, Claude McKay, Paulette Nardal, William Gardner Smith, Richard Wright and Shay Youngblood. Films may include Zouzou and La Permission. Ms. Yow

Prerequisite: two units of 200 level in English.

380a. and b. Henry James, Novice and Master (1)

Topic for 2010/11a:Henry James, Novice and Master. Henry James's literary career began just after the Civil War and ended on the brink of the first World War. Within this time frame, James evolved from a Transatlantic novelist of manners, preoccupied with the adventures of nouveau riche Americans, into a master stylist living abroad, paving the way for the next generation of expatriate American modernists. This course will chart James's trajectory from conventional artist to timorous avant gardist through a chronological reading of select major novels, stories, travel writing, memoirs, and criticism, by and about Henry James. Following the publication of the Golden Bowl (1904), James confessed to a friend: "I can't read the new novel, and I wonder that I am condemned to write it." This course will decipher that paradox. Ms. Graham.

(Same as Africana Studies 380b.) Topic for 2010/11b: The Blues and /in Black Literature. The blues makes audible the struggles and the resilience of African Americans. This seminar will explore the relationship and influence of blues music on black literary production during the 20th century. We'll listen to sound recordings and watch videos, as we explore how black writers make use of blues aesthetics, themes, and even personas to craft their literary worlds. We'll think about the relationship between a musical form and literary texts. And questions of black vernacular tradition, gender, urbanization, migration, violence, and love will guide us. Readings may include: James Baldwin, Sherman Alexie, Angela Davis, Ralph Ellison, Langston Hughes, Gayl Jones, and others. Ms. Dunbar.

381b. Rewriting the Text: Writing New Words from Old (1)

Save for one's own neologisms, all of our language is received. How can one write newly in language that was devised by the past in order to speak in and to its time? Can one ignore a language's literature and make a fresh start with old words? Does one need to know the past of a language in order to write its present? Authors studied in the course know earlier authors' works, which they use to make new fictions. The authors may include Homer, Virgil, Shakespeare, Dryden, Milton, Pope, Radcliffe, Austen, Malory, Twain, Forster, and Cheever. Mr. Weedin.

382. English Semi (1)

"Night now! Tell me, tell me, tell me, elm! Night night! Telmetale of stem or stone. Beside the rivering waters of, hitherandthithering waters of. Night!" -- James Joyce, Finnegans Wake "When the sense is sleep, the words go to sleep." -- Samuel Beckett, on Joyce's Wake "What happens at night?" -- Maurice Blanchot.

The night provides cover for a swarm of lurid modernist motifs: dreamwork, somnambulism, drift, intoxication, sexual transgression, abjection, mania, and more. But it does not only appear as setting and content. As Freud pointed out, what happens at night messes with our minds, with our linguistic sovereignty and our representational logic. Night interrupts the continuum of habitual life and current events, in Benjamin's phrase, the "homogeneous, empty time" by which we take stock of how hard we have worked, how much we have earned, and how far we have come. What happens - to history, to subjectivity, to language - at night? Does nocturnal writing offer us a counter-discourse of modernity? Does it lead us deeper into dream, into the phantasmagoria of everyday life? And can it, paradoxically, jolt us awake? For this seminar, we read an assortment of modernist texts shaped by night life: assorted texts by Poe and Baudelaire, Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the "Anna Livia Plurabelle" section of Finnegans Wake, Barnes' Nightwood, Stein's Tender Buttons, Brown's 1450-1950, something by Beckett, Breton's Surrealist manifestoes, some Kafka stories, some Freud and Benjamin essays, and perhaps Blanchot's The Madness of the Day. Mr. Chang.

384. The Literature of Friendship (1)

This seminar explores the treatment of friendship in a wide range of texts, mainly literary but also historical and philosophical, from antiquity through the present, including works by Aristotle, Cicero, Sappho, Po Chu-I, Shakespeare, Montaigne, Dr. Johnson, Keats, Wilde, Frederick Douglass, Jorge Luis Borges, Anna Akhmatova, Lillian Hellman, Elizabeth Bishop, Groucho Marx, Adrienne Rich, Michael Harper, Helen Garner, and Carol Smith-Rosenberg. Mr. Sharp.

385. English Seminar (1)

386. English Seminar (1)

399a or b. Senior Independent Work (1/2 or 1)

Open by permission of the chair.

One unit of credit given only in exceptional cases.