Art Department

Chair: Harry RosemanLecturer: James MundyProfessors: Nicholas AdamsEve D'AmbraSusan Donahue KuretskyKaren LucicBrian LukacherMolly NesbitHarry RosemanAssociate Professors: Peter M. CharlapaLisa Gail CollinsaAssistant Professors: Tobias ArmborstbYvonne Elet,Karen HwangLaura NewmanAndrew TallonbAdjunct Assistant Professors: Olga BushJudith LinnGina RuggeriDidier WilliamPost Doctoral Fellow: Isolde BrielmaierLibrarian: Thomas E. Hill.

Requirements for Concentration in Art History: The major consists of a minimum of 12 units. 10 units, including Art 105-106, must be graded art history courses taken at Vassar.  2 units may be taken in studio art or architectural design, or may be transferred from work completed outside of Vassar, such as courses taken during Junior Year Abroad.

Distribution:  6 units at the 200-level must be divided equally between groups A, B, and C. 3 units must be in 300-level art history courses:  two seminars in different art historical groups and 301 (senior project).  300-level seminars are to be selected on the basis of courses in the same area already taken on the 200-level.  Majors are urged to take a 300-level seminar before 301.

A: Ancient, Medieval, Asian art

B: Italian and Northern Renaissance and baroque art, Renaissance and baroque architecture (Art 270, 271), American art (Art 250)

C: Nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first century art, American art (Art 251, Art 266), nineteenth century to contemporary architecture (Art 272, Art 273), African art

Departmental and interdisciplinary courses that do not conform to the groupings listed above may be applied to the distribution requirements upon approval of the student’s major adviser.

Ungraded/NRO work may not be used to satisfy the requirements for the art history concentration.

Senior Year Requirements: Art 301 and 1 additional unit at the 300-level. Majors concentrating in art history are required to write a senior paper, based upon independent research and supervised by a member of the department. Petitions for exemption from this requirement, granted only in special circumstances, must be submitted to the chair in writing by the first day of classes in the A semester.

Recommendations: The selection and sequence of courses for the major should be planned closely with the major adviser. Students are advised to take courses in the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture, and are strongly encouraged to take at least one studio course. Students considering graduate study in art history are advised to take courses in foreign languages: German, and the Romance, Classical, or Asian languages, depending on areas of interest. Students with special interest in architectural design and/or city planning should meet with the departmental adviser to discuss this concentration.

The art department offers a correlate sequence in art history to allow students to develop an area of significant interest outside their major field of concentration. In consultation with a departmental adviser, the student selects a body of courses encompassing introductory through advanced study and covering more than one historical period. The Correlate Sequence in Art History: 6 graded units including Art 105-106, three 200-level courses in at least two art historical period groups, and one 300-level course.

Advisers: the art history faculty.

Requirements for Concentration in Studio Art: 13 units; 4 units must be in graded art history courses, consisting of Art 105-106 and two 200-level courses in different groups (A, B, C) listed above; 9 studio units, 7 of which must be graded units taken at Vassar, including Art 102-103; 4 units in 200-level studio courses, of which 2 must be Art 204-205 and 2 must be in sequential courses in painting, drawing, printmaking, photography or architecture drawing and design; 3 units in 300-level studio courses including Art 301. By special permission up to 2 units of Art 298 and 399 work can be included in the major.

Senior Year Requirements: Art 301 and 1 additional unit at the 300-level.

Studio Art: Entrance into the studio concentration is determined by evaluation of the student’s class work and by a review of the student’s portfolio by the studio faculty. The portfolio may be submitted for evaluation at any time, ordinarily between the spring of the sophomore year and the spring of the junior year. Students taking studio courses are charged a fee to cover the cost of some materials, and they may be responsible for the purchase of additional materials. Studio majors are required to attend and participate in the majors’ critiques.

Students who wish to concentrate in studio art are advised to take Art 102-103 in their freshman year and at least one additional studio course in the sophomore year in order to have a portfolio of work to be evaluated for admission to the studio art concentration. Those students interested in the studio concentration should consult the studio faculty no later than the end of the sophomore year. NRO work may not be used to satisfy the requirements for the studio concentration. In order to receive credit for courses taken during Junior Year Abroad, students must submit a portfolio of work for review by the studio art faculty.

Advisers: the studio art faculty.

Architectural Design: Students interested in the field of architectural design should consult with members of the architectural design advisory committee.

Tobias Armborst, Harry Roseman, Andrew Tallon, Nicholas Adams

I. Introductory

105a. Introduction to the History of Art (1)

An historical and analytical introduction to architecture, sculpture, and painting. The department.

Year-long course, 105-106.

Open to all classes. Enrollment limited by class.

Three 50-minute periods and one 50-minute conference section.

106b. Introduction to the History of Art (1)

An historical and analytical introduction to architecture, sculpture, and painting. The department.

Year-long course, 105-106.

Open to all classes. Enrollment limited by class.

Three 50-minute periods and one 50-minute conference section.

120a. Viewing and Reading Race in Today's Visual Culture (1)

This course draws on individual case studies to explore ideas and representations of race, specifically as they relate to people of African descent in today's global visual culture. Focusing on the twenty-first century, we consider ways of viewing and "reading" race in contemporary visual art, film, video, mass media, fashion, advertising and music. Ms. Brielmaier.

Open to freshmen. Limited enrollment.

Satisfies college requirement for Freshman Writing Seminar.

Two 75-minute periods.

170b. Rome (1)

(Same as Urban Studies 170) An overview of the history of the eternal city from its legendary origins to the present as seen through its architecture and urbanism. The development of major sites (the Forum, the Capitoline, St. Peter's) and significant architecture (from the Pantheon to Richard Meier). Rome as the site of architectural fantasy and imagination and its influence throughout the western world (London, Washington, St. Petersburg). Readings, films, guest lecturers. (This course cannot be used to fulfill distribution requirements for the major in Art History.) Mr. Adams.

Two 75-minute periods.

Not offered in 2010/11.

184a. Tradition and Innovation in Native North American Art (1)

Drawing on the resources of the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, students in this course develop the tools to analyze and interpret original objects made by diverse groups of Native peoples. The aim is to understand indigenous creative expression through first-hand contact with actual works. Readings and films deepen awareness of the social context from which the works emerged. Emphasis is on achieving effective skills of verbal and written expression, as well as the appreciation of the unique characteristics of Native American art. Ms. Lucic

Open to freshman. Limited enrollment.

Satisfies the college requirement for a Freshman Writing Seminar.

Two 75-minute-periods.

II. Intermediate

210b. Greek Art and Architecture (1)

(Same as Greek and Roman Studies 210a) Sculpture, vase painting, and architecture from the Archaic and Classical periods, with glances back to the Bronze Age and forward to the Hellenistic kingdoms. Stylistic developments leading to the ideal types of hero, warrior, athlete, maiden, etc. are central to the course, along with the mythological subjects that glorified the city‑state and marked religious cults and the rituals of everyday life. Ms. D'Ambra.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106 or Classics 216 or 217, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

Not offered in 2010/11.

211a. Roman Art and Architecture (1)

(Same as Greek and Roman Studies 211a) Sculpture, painting, and architecture in the Roman Republic and Empire. Topics include: the appeal of Greek styles, the spread of artistic and architectural forms throughout the vast empire and its provinces, the role of art as political propaganda for state and as status symbols for private patrons. Ms. D'Ambra.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106 or Classics 218 or 219, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

220a. Medieval Architecture (1)

A survey of the greatest moments in Western, Byzantine and Islamic architecture from the reign of Constantine to the late middle ages and the visual, symbolic and structural language developed by the masters and patrons responsible for them. Particular attention is paid to issues of representation: the challenge of bringing a medieval building into the classroom, that of translating our impressions of these buildings into words and images, and the ways in which other students and scholars have done so. Mr. Tallon.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, coursework in Medieval Studies, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

221a. The Sacred Arts of the Middle Ages (1)

A selective chronological exploration of the art of western Europe from early Christian Rome to the late Gothic North, with excursions into the lands of Byzantium and Islam. Works of differing scale and media, from monumental and devotional sculpture, manuscript illumination, metalwork, to stained glass, painting and mosaic, are considered formally and iconographicallly, but also in terms of their reception. Students work directly with medieval objects held in the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center and with manuscripts in the Special Collections of the Vassar Library. Mr. Tallon.

Prerequisites: Art 105-106, or coursework in Medieval Studies, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

230a. Northern Renaissance Painting (1)

Early Netherlandish and German painting and printmaking from Campin and van Eyck to Bruegel, Holbein, and Dürer. The course examines northern European attitudes toward nature, devotional art and portraiture that developed in the early fifteenth century and their evolution up to and through the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century. Ms. Kuretsky.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

Not offered in 2011-12.

231b. Dutch and Flemish Painting in the Seventeenth Century (1)

An exploration of the new forms of secular and religious art that developed during the Golden Age of the Netherlands in the works of Rubens, Rembrandt, Vermeer and their contemporaries. The course examines the impact of differing religions on Flanders and the Dutch Republic, while exploring how political, economic and scientific factors encouraged the formation of seventeenth century Netherlandish art. Ms. Kuretsky.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

235a. Art In Early Renaissance Italy (1)

A survey of Italian art from c. 1300 - c.1485, focusing on painting, sculpture and decorative arts by artists including Giotto, Fra Angelico, Mantegna, Botticelli, Donatello, and the della Robbia. We consider works in social, political, religious, and cultural contexts, looking at various forms of patronage as we move from the republics of Florence, Siena, and Venice to the courts of Mantua and Urbino, and to papal Rome. Particular attention is given to the original function and settings of works; the Renaissance reception of antiquity; notions of artistic competition and originality; developments in perspective and illusionism; experiments with new media; and the relation of contemporary art theory to artistic practice. Ms. Elet.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of the instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

236b. Art in the Age of Leonardo, Raphael, and Michelangelo (1)

An exploration of the works of these three great masters and their contemporaries in Italy, c. 1485 - c. 1565. The primary focus is on painting and sculpture, but the course also considers drawings, prints, landscape, gardens, and decorative arts, emphasizing artists' increasing tendency to work in multiple media. We trace changing ideas about the role of the artist and the nature of artistic creativity, which are expressed in these works and in theoretical debates about the superiority of painting or sculpture, and the primacy of design or color. Other topics include interactions between artists and patrons; the role of the spectator; ritual and ceremonial; contemporary ideas about sexuality and gender; and historical constructs of genius. Ms. Elet.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

250a. Change and Diversity in American Art, from the Beginnings to 1865 (1)

This course examines the arts of the prehistoric, colonial, early republic, and antebellum periods. Important figures include painters such as Copley, West, Mount, Cole, and Church, and architects such as Jefferson, Bulfinch, Latrobe, Davis, and Downing. In addition, we consider the diverse and often overlooked contributions of women, Native Americans, African Americans, and folk artists. Ms. Lucic.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor.

Not offered in 2010-11

Two 75-minute periods.

251b. The Challenge of Modernity: American Art 1865-1945 (1)

Painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, and design during America's "coming-of-age'' as a cultural, economic, and political power. The course examines the work of such figures as Richardson, Sullivan, Wright, Homer, Eakins, Cassatt, Sargent, Whistler, O'Keeffe, Hopper, Stieglitz, Strand, and the artists of the Harlem Renaissance. Instructor TBA.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

253b. The Arts of Central, Eastern, and Southern Africa (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 253b) This course explores the ways in which sculpture, textiles, painting, drawing, and photography function both historically and currently in relationship to particular themes such as religion, trade and diaspora (both Atlantic and Indian Ocean), political power and healing. We also consider the visual arts in relationship to ideas of improvisation, identity and self-representation, and forms of resistance. Ms. Brielmaier.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106.

Two 75-minute periods.

254a. The Arts of Western and Northern Africa (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 254a) This course is organized thematically and examines the ways in which sculpture, architecture, painting, and photography function both historically and currently in relationship to broader cultural issues. Within this context, this course explores performance and masquerade in relationship to gender, social, and political power. We also consider the connections between the visual arts and cosmology, Islam, identity, ideas of diaspora, colonialism and post-colonialism, as well as the representation of the "Self", and the "Other". Ms. Brielmaier.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106.

Two 75-minute periods.

256. The Arts of China (1)

(Same as Asian Studies 256) Landscape Painting and Portraiture from the Song dynasty to the Present (960-2010). Chinese painters of the Song dynasty onward wielded their brush with profound awareness of the past. Discussions focus on the impact of the painters' construction of the past on the overall history of Chinese painting, as well as other important art historical issues, such as: tradition vs. the individual; amateurism vs. professionalism; the critic vs. the historian; and imitation vs. forgery. Ms. Hwang-Gold.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

258b. The Arts of Japan:The Three Shogunates (1)

(Same as Asia 258) Topic for 2010/11: The Three Shogunates: Japanese Art from the Kamakura through the Edo Periods (1185-1868). This course examines Japanese art of the period during which feudal lords governed out of a military government called the bakufu. We will consider the role of the warlords, monks, and merchants in developing new kinds of visual forms and aesthetics in a wide range of media—including sculpture, painting, ceramics, woodblock prints, architecture, and tea utensils. Ms. Hwang-Gold.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

259a. The Arts of East Asia (1)

(Same as Asian Studies 259) An introduction to the arts of China, Korea, and Japan from the Neolithic period to the present. The course surveys a broad range of media, including ceramics, sculpture, calligraphy, painting, architecture, lacquer, and woodblock prints, with particular focus on the ways in which each of the three cultures has negotiated the shared "East Asian" cultural experience and its sense of a distinct self. The works to be examined invite discussions about appropriation, reception, and reinterpretation of images and concepts as they traversed the East Asian cultural sphere. Ms. Hwang-Gold.

Two 75-minute periods.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor

262a. Art and Revolution in Europe, 1789-1848 (1)

A survey of major movements and figures in European art, 1789-1848, focusing on such issues as the contemporaneity of antiquity in revolutionary history painting, the eclipse of mythological and religious art by an art of social observation and political commentary, the romantic cult of genius, imagination, and creative self-definition, and the emergence of landscape painting in an industrializing culture. Mr. Lukacher.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

263b. Painters of Modern Life: Realism, Impressionism, Symbolism (1)

A survey of major movements and figures in European art, 1848-1900, examining the realist, impressionist, and symbolist challenges to the dominant art institutions, aesthetic assumptions, and social values of the period; also addressing how a critique of modernity and a sociology of aesthetics can be seen developing through these phases of artistic experimentation. Mr. Lukacher.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

264a. The Avant-Gardes, 1889-1929 (1)

(Same as Media Studies 264a) The formation of the European avant-gardes is studied as part of the general modernization of everyday life. Various media are included: painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, the applied arts, and film. Ms. Nesbit.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods and one weekly film screening.

265b. Modern Art and the Mass Media, 1929-1968 (1)

(Same as Media Studies 265a) The history of modernist painting in Europe and America from 1930 to 1975, together with those contemporary developments in film, photography, and the mass media. Special attention is paid to the criticism, theory, and politics of the image. Ms. Nesbit.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods and one weekly film screening.

266b. African American Arts and Artifacts (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 266) An introduction to the artistic and material production of African Americans in the U.S. from the colonial period to the present day. We examine multiple influences on (African, European, American, diasporic, etc.) and uses for black creative expression. Working with an expansive conception of art, we pay close attention to the work of formally and non-formally trained artists in relation to their social, cultural, aesthetic, and historical contexts. Ms. Collins.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

Not offered in 2010/11.

268b. The Times, 1968 - now (1)

(Same as Media Studies 268b) This course studies the visual arts of the last thirty years, in America and abroad, together with the often difficult discussion emerging around them. The traditional fine arts as well as the new media, performance, film and architecture are included. Ms. Nesbit.

Prerequisite: Art 264 or 265 or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

Not offered in 2010/11.

270a. Renaissance Architecture (1)

European architecture and city building from 1300-1500; focus on Italian architecture and Italian architects; encounters between Italian and other cultures throughout Europe and the Mediterranean. Mr. Adams.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or 170 or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

271. Early Modern Architecture (1)

Topic for 2010/11b. Baroque Architecture. This course covers European architecture with emphasis on Italy, France, and the British Isles from 1600-1800. Among the architects we examine are Bernini, Borromini, the Mansarts, Vanbrugh and Fischer von Erlach and buildings such as St Peter's, Rome, Versailles and the abbey Church at Ottobeuren. Mr. Adams.

Two 75-minutes.

Art 105-106, or 170, or by permission of instructor.

272b. Architecture after the Industrial Revolution (1)

Architecture was utterly changed by the industrial revolution of the eighteenth century. This course examines the changes in materials (iron and steel), building type (exhibition halls, train stations), and architectural practice (the rise of professional societies). The course terminates with the rise of modernism at the beginning of the twentieth century (Gropius, Le Corbusier), an architecture that fully embodied these industrial changes. Mr. Adams.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or 170 or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

273. Modern Architecture and Beyond (1)

(Same as Urban Studies 273b) European and American architecture and city building (1920 to the present); examination of the diffusion of modernism and its reinterpretation by corporate America and Soviet Russia. Discussion of subsequent critiques of modernism (postmodernism, deconstruction, new urbanism) and their limitations. Issues in contemporary architecture. Mr. Adams.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or 170, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

284b. The Art of Native North America (1)

Drawing on the collections of the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, this course addresses issues regarding the acquisition and exhibition of Native American art. During the first part of the semester, we develop an awareness of these issues through study of key case studies. Investigation of this topic focuses on skills of critical evaluation and verbal/written exposition. In the second half of the semester, the students participate in creating an on-line virtual exhibition of Native art. Ms. Lucic.

Prerequisites: Art 105-06, or a course in Native Studies, or permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute-periods.

Not offered in 2010/11.

288b. Islamic Art and Architecture, 7th-13th C (1)

The course is designed to familiarize the student with the evolution of Islamic art and architecture in different regions of the Islamic world in the period from the seventh to the thirteenth century. Major emphasis is placed on the establishment of an Islamic tradition, the formation of visual identity in the context of multi-cultural landscapes, exchange and appropriation in the development of regional styles. The issues of function and patronage are explored in the examination of the varied types of architectural structures and of the portable arts, ceramics, metalwork, textiles and books. Ms. Bush.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106.

Two 75-minute periods.

290a or b. Field Work (1/2 or 1)

Projects undertaken in cooperation with approved galleries, archives, collections, or other agencies concerned with the visual arts, including architecture. The department.

May be taken either semester or in the summer.

Open by permission of a supervising instructor. Not included in the minimum requirements for the major.

Prerequisites: Art 105-106 and one 200-level course.

298a or b. Independent Work (1/2 or 1)

Open by permission of the instructor with the concurrence of the adviser in the field of concentration. Not included in the minimum for the major.

III. Advanced

300a or b. Senior Paper Preparation (1/2)

Optional. Regular meetings with a faculty member to prepare an annotated bibliography and thesis statement for the senior paper. Course must be scheduled in the semester prior to the writing of the senior paper. Credit given only upon completion of the senior paper. Ungraded.

Prerequisite: permission of the chair of the department.

301a or b. Senior Project (1)

Supervised independent research culminating in a written paper or a supervised independent project in studio art.

310b. Seminar in Ancient Art (1)

(Same as Greek and Roman Studies 310) Topic for 2010/11b: Hadrian and World Empire. The emperor Hadrian ruled the Roman Empire at its peak of prosperity and influence in the cosmopolitan society of the mid-second c.e. Hadrian, characterized as an intellectual and architect, played a crucial role in cultural affairs: the construction of the Pantheon in Rome, the founding of cities across the empire as miniature models of Rome, the revival of Greek learning and the monumental development of Athens, and the planning of his villa outside of Rome with buildings evoking the major monuments and destinations of the ancient world. Ms. D'Ambra.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 2-hour period.

Not offered in 2010-11.

320a. Seminar in Medieval Art (1)

Topic for 2010/11a: The Art and Architecture of the Pilgrimage Roads. The mindset of the pilgrim, the universal human desire to seek the transcendent through a spiritual or physical voyage, is inscribed from the very start, and at the deepest level, in the Christian faith. It is the physical manifestation of this desire that we study in this seminar: the art and architecture created to honor the saints whose tangible remains on earth, it was believed, retained miraculous powers; created to inspire, instruct, and some would say control those that came to venerate them. We begin in Jerusalem, where Christian pilgrimage, considered as an industry, began, and move to Rome, the site of the tombs of the apostles Peter and Paul. We examine the pilgrimage which, beginning in the eleventh century, supplanted those of both Jerusalem and Rome: the road to the tomb of the Apostle James in Santiago de Compostela. We conclude by considering the cult of the unlikely martyr Thomas Becket at Canterbury, and then embark upon a pilgrimage of our own: to the shrine of Saint Frances Cabrini and to the Cloisters Museum in New York. Mr. Tallon.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 3-hour period.

331a. Seminar in Northern Art (1)

Topic for 2010/11a: Art and Science in the Age of Vermeer. The seminar explores the importance of empirical investigation in the "Age of Observation" to developments in seventeenth century Dutch art and thought. After examining responses to nature on the part of earlier northern European painters such as Jan van Eyck, Albrecht Dürer, and Pieter Bruegel, we go on to consider, among other topics, the impact of lenses and the camera obscura on the art of Vermeer and his scientific and artistic contemporaries, relationships between botanical illustration and Dutch still life painting, and Rembrandt's depictions of anatomy lessons. Ms. Kuretsky.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 2-hour period.

332b. Seminar in Italian Renaissance Art (1)

Reconsidering Raphael. This great Renaissance master has long been known as "the prince of painters," but this label ignores the astonishing range of Raphael's activities and accomplishments. Not only a brilliant painter, he was also an accomplished architect, landscape designer, draftsman, designer of prints, archeologist, and papal surveyor of antiquities. This seminar reconsiders Raphael's oeuvre, taking a comprehensive view of his varied projects, and how they informed each other. We also examine his writings and his close collaborations with literary figures, including Baldassare Castiglione, addressing the relation of word and image. This synthetic approach allows a fuller appreciation of Raphael's brilliance and originality, and the reasons he was so admired in his own time and in later centuries. Ms. Elet.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Not offered in 2010/11.

One 3-hour period.

333b. Envisioning Paradise: Art in the Villas and Gardens of Early Modern Italy, c. 1450-c. 1650 (1)

Changing attitudes toward the relationship between art and nature in Renaissance and Baroque Italy were played out in the decoration of villas and gardens. The best known artists and patrons of the era created extensive estates in emulation of antiquity, with decorations in many media. These works blurred the line between indoors and outdoors, and challenged the viewer to determine what was by the hand of the artist or by Nature herself. We trace this play of nature and artifice, which positioned the artist as a godlike creator, and its consequences for the visual arts. We consider painting - especially landscapes - as well as sculpture, fountains, and grottoes in sites from Florence, Rome, the Veneto, and Naples to France. We discuss the reception of model villa decorations from Roman antiquity and medieval Islamic Spain; explore the influx of new flora and fauna during the exploration of "new" worlds; and examine changing patterns of collecting these new products of art and nature, such as the Kunstkammer. Other topics include the ideology of villa culture, the relation between city and country life, utopian conceptions of garden and landscape, and human dominion over nature. Ms. Elet

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 3-hour period.

354b. Seminar in African Art (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 354b) Contemporary African Photography and Video. This seminar explores the development of contemporary photographic and video practices as they relate to Africa. Organized thematically, it focuses on the individual case studies, artists, and exhibitions that comprise the dynamic and international realm of contemporary photo and video by artists living inside and outside of the African continent. Emphasis is placed on the changing significance and role of photography within African and trans-African contexts. As a part of this process, we consider issues of representation; documentation, critiques, and re-framing of socio-political issues and global relations; the visual articulation of racial, ethnic, gendered and religious identities; as well as aesthetic ideas, performance and the role of varied audiences and reception. Ms. Brielmaier.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 2-hour period.

358b. Seminar in Asian Art (1)

(Same as Asian Studies 358) Topic for 2010/11b:The Arts of Chinese Buddhism. This seminar examines Chinese Buddhist art of the period between its introduction in the first century C.E. to the Mongol conquest of China in 1279. We consider famous Buddhist cave-shrines along the Silk Road, as well as paintings and sculptures produced in the Central Plains of China. Topics for discussion include: the role of images in the dissemination and development of Chinese Buddhism; text versus image; image versus divine presence; theology and theocracy; gender and religion; and art and ritual. Ms. Hwang-Gold.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 2-hour period.

362a. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Art (1)

Ruskin, Baudelaire, and Art Criticism in Nineteenth-Century Europe. This seminar examines the art criticism and social opinions of John Ruskin and Charles Baudelaire, whose writings on English and French art and culture converged around the following issues: the instrumentality of nature in an industrial/urban society; the pleasures and tribulations of the commodity, fashion and femininity; the contesting claims of sensuality and morality in esthetic experience; and the nostalgia for the historical past. We explore how Ruskin and Baudelaire developed art criticism as a controversial medium for social and cultural commentary at the nexus of romanticism and modernism. Mr. Lukacher.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 2-hour period.

364a. Seminar in Twentieth-Century Art (1)

Topic for 2010/11a: Photographs and Books. This seminar studies the relationship of photographs to books, both in theory and in practice, in the twentieth century. Ms. Nesbit.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 2-hour period.

366b. Seminar in African American Art and Cultural History: (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 366b and American Culture 366b) Creativity and Politics During the Jazz Age and the Great Depression. Focusing on the experiences and representations of African Americans in the U.S., this seminar examines the arts, institutions, and ideas of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and New Deal projects of the 1930s and 1940s. Analyzing paintings, sculptures, photographs, novels, folk arts, murals, illustrations, manifestos, films, performances, and various systems of patronage, we explore relationships between art, politics, and society. Ms. Collins.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 2-hour period.

Not offered in 2010/11.

367b. Artists' Books from the Women's Studio Workshop (1)

(Same as American Culture 367 and Women's Studies 367) In this interdisciplinary seminar, we explore the limited edition artists' books created through the Women's Studio Workshop in Rosendale, New York. Founded in 1974, the Women's Studio Workshop encourages the voice and vision of individual women artists, and women artists associated with the workshop have, since 1979, created over 180 hand-printed books using a variety of media, including hand-made paper, letterpress, silkscreen, photography, intaglio, and ceramics. Vassar College recently became an official repository for this vibrant collection which, in the words of the workshop's co-founder, documents "the artistic activities of the longest continually operating women's workspace in the country." Working directly with the artists' books, this seminar will meet in Vassar Library's Special Collections and closely investigate the range of media, subject matter, and aesthetic sensibilities of the rare books, as well as their contexts and meanings. We will also travel to the Women's Studio Workshop to experience firsthand the artistic process in an alternative space. Ms. Collins

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

One 2-hour period.

370b. Seminar in Architectural History: Looking at Great Buildings (1)

(Same as Urban Studies 370b)

The class consists of alternate meetings on campus and at buildings in our region. In class we meet to discuss the nature of the building after reading all the significant literature on the building. In visiting the building we seek to test the principles and positions we read about in class. Among the buildings we expect to visit are: Louis A. Kahn, British Art Center; Mies van der Rohe, Seagram Building; Frank Gehry, Fischer Center; Frank Lloyd Wright, Guggenheim Museum; Marcel Breuer, Whitney Museum; Bunshaft, Beinecke Library. Field trips are an essential part of this course. Photography, drawings, written description; research project. Mr. Adams.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

One 3-hour period.

378b. Seminar in Museum Studies (1)

What the Art Object Can Tell Us. This seminar focuses only on original works of art from the over 17,000 objects in the permanent and loan collections at the Loeb Art Center. The class explores how history and society affect the creation and reception of art objects. Special attention is paid to patterns of collecting, conservation, and connoisseurship. Mr. Mundy.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 2-hour period.

Not offered in 2010/11.

382b. Belle Ribicoff Seminar in the History of Art: Beyond Borders (1)

Topic for 2010/11b: Beyond Borders. This seminar examines the impact of travel and trade in fostering aesthetic sensibilities that transcended medieval political, religious or national borders. Beyond Borders examines the role played by diplomatic missions and military campaigns, and international commerce in shaping the form, material, and decoration of medieval works of art. Students are asked to give seminar reports, focusing on an object or group of objects in The Cloisters Collection, such as Limoges enamels, ivory carvings, textiles, lusterware or goldsmiths’ work. Classes meet two hours once a week at The Cloisters, Metropolitan Museum in NYC; and works of art are studied both in the galleries and in the storeroom. Transportation is provided. Ms. Boehm.

Prerequisite: permission of the chair of the department.

One 2-hour period.

Course is ungraded.

385b. Seminar in American Art (1)

Topic for 2010/11b: Modernity and the Movies: The Material Culture of Hollywood Films in the 1940s and 1950s This course examines the contribution of set designs, costumes, hair styles and body types to the narrative structures of classic Hollywood films. The goal is to appreciate filmmakers' creative adaptation of American material culture and to understand the complex and often conflicting attitudes toward modernity in the mid-twentieth century. The course includes films with striking design concepts that invoke industrial, technological and urban modernity. Retreat from modernity into a small town or suburban pastoralism is also considered. Filmmakers include Alfred Hitchcock, Douglas Sirk, Preston Sturges, William Wyler, Vincent Minnelli, and Billy Wilder. Ms. Lucic.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 2-hour period and one weekly film screening.

399a or b. Senior Independent Work (1/2 or 1)

Open by permission of the instructor with the concurrence of the department adviser in the field of concentration. Not included in the minimum for the major.

Studio Work in Design, Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, and Architectural Design

I. Introductory

102a. Drawing I (1)

Development of visual ideas through a range of approaches to drawing. Emphasis is placed on perceptual drawing from life, through subjects including landscape, interior, still life, and the human figure. In the second semester, figure drawing is the primary focus. Throughout the year, students work in a range of black and white media, as the elements of drawing (line, shape, value, form, space and texture) are investigated through specific problems. Mr. Charlap, Ms. Newman, Ms. Ruggeri, Mr. Rowland, Mr. William.

Year-long course, 102-103.

Open to all classes.

Two 2-hour periods.

103b. Drawing I (1)

Development of visual ideas through a range of approaches to drawing. Emphasis is placed on perceptual drawing from life, through subjects including landscape, interior, still life, and the human figure. In the second semester, figure drawing is the primary focus. Throughout the year, students work in a range of black and white media, as the elements of drawing (line, shape, value, form, space and texture) are investigated through specific problems. Mr. Charlap, Ms. Newman, Ms. Ruggeri, Mr. Rowland, Mr. William.

Year-long course, 102-103.

Open to all classes.

Two 2-hour periods.

108b. Color (1)

To develop students' understanding of color as a phenomenon and its role in art. Color theories are discussed and students solve problems to investigate color interactions using collage and paint. Mr. Charlap.

Open to all classes.

Not offered in 2010/11.

176a. Architectural Design I (1)

A studio-based class introduction to architectural design through a series of short projects. Employing a combination of drawing, modeling and collage techniques (both by hand and using digital technology) students begin to record, analyze and create architectural space and form. Mr. Armborst.

Prerequisite: Art 102-103, corequisite: one of the following: Art 220, 270, 272 or 273, or by permission of the instructor.

Two 2-hour period.

II. Intermediate

202a. Painting I (1)

Basic painting skills are explored through a sequence of specific problems involving landscape, still life, and the figure. Instruction in the use of various painting media. Mr. Charlap.

Prerequisite: Art 102-103.

Year-long course, 202-203.

Two 2-hour periods.

203b. Painting I (1)

Basic painting skills are explored through a sequence of specific problems involving landscape, still life, and the figure. Instruction in the use of various painting media. Mr. Charlap.

Prerequisite: Art 102-103.

Year-long course, 202-203.

Two 2-hour periods.

204a. Sculpture I (1)

Introduction to the language of three-dimensional form through a sequence of specific problems which involve the use of various materials. Mr. Roseman.

Year-long course, 204-205.

Two 2-hour periods.

205b. Sculpture I (1)

Introduction to the language of three-dimensional form through a sequence of specific problems which involve the use of various materials. Mr. Roseman.

Year-long course, 204-205.

Two 2-hour periods.

206a. Drawing II (1)

The course explores contemporary drawing strategies. Students take an interpretative approach to assignments, and work from a variety of subjects including the human figure, found objects, landscape, and images. Mr. Charlap, Ms. Ruggeri.

Prerequisite: Art 102a or other studio course.

Two 2-hour periods.

207b. Drawing II (1)

The course explores contemporary drawing strategies. Students take an interpretative approach to assignments, and work from a variety of subjects including the human figure, found objects, landscape, and images. Mr. Charlap, Ms. Ruggeri.

Prerequisite: Art 102a or other studio course.

Two 2-hour periods.

Not offered in 2011/12

208a. Printmaking: Introduction (1)

A variety of printmaking concepts and procedures are explored through a series of assignments in monotype and collagraph. Mr. William.

Corequisite: Art 102a.

Two 2-hour periods.

209b. Printmaking: Intaglio (1)

The intaglio techniques of line etching, aquatint, and dry point, as well as their variations, are applied to making both black and white and color prints. Mr. William.

Prerequisite: Art 102a.

Two 2-hour periods.

Alternate years.

Not offered in 2010/11.

212a. Photography (1)

An investigation of the visual language of black and white photography. The technical and expressive aspects of exposing film, developing negatives, and printing in the darkroom are explored. No previous photographic experience is necessary. Students are required to provide their own camera, film and photographic paper. Ms Linn.

Prerequisites: Art 102-103.

One 4-hour period.

213b. Photography II (1)

This course explores the development of an individual photographic language. Technical aspects of exposure, developing and printing are taught as integral to the formation of a personal visual esthetic. All students are required to supply their own camera, film, and photographic paper. Ms Linn.

Prerequisite:Art 102-103 and/or permission of the instructor.

One 4-hour period.

214a. Color Digital Photography (1)

This course examines how color in light delineates space and form. The goal of this class is to record this phenomenon as accurately as possible. Scanning traditional silver gelatin film and digital capture systems are utilized. Digital color prints are produced using Photoshop and inkjet printing. Some of the topics covered are the documentary value of color information, the ability of the computer program to idealize our experience of reality, and the demise of the latent image. Ms. Linn.

Prerequisite: Art 212 or 213 and/or permission of the instructor.

Two 2-hour periods.

217a. Video Art (1)

(Same as Film 217) Video Art has for some time been an important medium for visual artists. It has taken its place along with and often in tandem with all of the major categories of art production. The students are expected to learn how to "speak" using Video technology. This course is an exploration of the scope and possibilities of this important medium. The students learn the technical expertise necessary to be able to produce work in this medium. Student work is periodically screened and discussed by the class and the teacher, so that relationships between video and how it is implemented to best serve the visual, conceptual and narrative aspects of the work is better understood. Regular screenings of videos and films provide students with a context of historical and contemporary practices in which to consider their own production.

Prerequisite: Art 102-103 and/or permission of the instructor.

Two 2-hour periods.

275. Architectural Drawing (1)

276b. Architectural Design II (1)

A studio-based course aimed at further developing architectural drawing and design skills. Employing a variety of digital and non-digital techniques students record, analyze and create architectural space and form in a series of design exercises. Mr. Armborst.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Two 2-hour periods.

Not offered in 2010/11.

284b. The Art of Native North America (1)

Drawing on the collections of the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, this course addresses issues regarding the acquisition and exhibition of Native American art. During the first part of the semester, we develop an awareness of these issues through study of key case studies. Investigation of this topic focuses on skills of critical evaluation and verbal/written exposition. In the second half of the semester, the students participate in creating an on-line virtual exhibition of Native art. Ms. Lucic.

Prerequisites: Art 105-06, or a course in Native Studies, or permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute-periods.

Not offered in 2010/11.

III. Advanced

302a. Painting II (1)

This course investigates painting through a series of assigned open-ended projects. Because it is intended to help students develop a context in which to make independent choices, it explores a wide range of conceptual and formal approaches to painting. Ms. Newman.

Prerequisite: Art 202a-203b.

Two 2-hour periods.

303b. Painting II (1)

This course investigates painting through a series of assigned open-ended projects. Because it is intended to help students develop a context in which to make independent choices, it explores a wide range of conceptual and formal approaches to painting. Ms. Newman.

Prerequisite: Art 202a-203b.

Two 2-hour periods.

304a. Sculpture II (1)

Art 304 is devoted to the study of perception and depiction. This is done through an intensive study of the human figure, still life, landscape, and interior space. Meaning is explored through a dialectic setup between subject and the means by which it is visually explored and presented. Within this discussion relationships between three-dimensional space and varying degrees of compressed space are also explored. In Art 305 we concentrate on the realization of conceptual constructs as a way to approach sculpture. The discussions and assignments in both semesters revolve around ways in which sculpture holds ideas and symbolic meanings in the uses of visual language. Mr. Roseman.

Prerequisite: Art 204a-205b or by permission of instructor.

Two 2-hour periods.

305b. Sculpture II (1)

Art 304 is devoted to the study of perception and depiction. This is done through an intensive study of the human figure, still life, landscape, and interior space. Meaning is explored through a dialectic setup between subject and the means by which it is visually explored and presented. Within this discussion relationships between three-dimensional space and varying degrees of compressed space are also explored. In Art 305 we concentrate on the realization of conceptual constructs as a way to approach sculpture. The discussions and assignments in both semesters revolve around ways in which sculpture holds ideas and symbolic meanings in the uses of visual language. Mr. Roseman. Mr. Rowland.

Prerequisite: Art 204a-205b or by permission of instructor.

Two 2-hour periods.

Not offered in 2010/11.

375a. Architectural Design III (1)

Visual Constructs. An examination of a number of visual constructs, analyzing the ways architects and urbanists have employed maps, models and projections to construct particular, partial views of the physical world. Using a series of mapping, drawing and diagramming exercises, students analyze these constructs and then appropriate, expand upon, or hybridize established visualization techniques. Mr. Armborst.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Two 2-hour periods.

379b. Computer Animation: Art, Science and Criticism (1)

(Same as Computer Science 379b and Media Studies 379b) An interdisciplinary course in Computer Animation aimed at students with previous experience in Computer Science, Studio Art, or Media Studies. The course introduces students to mathematical and computational principles and techniques for describing the shape, motion and shading of three-dimensional figures in Computer Animation. It introduces students to artistic principles and techniques used in drawing, painting and sculpture, as they are translated into the context of Computer Animation. It also encourages students to critically examine Computer Animation as a medium of communication. Finally, the course exposes students to issues that arise when people from different scholarly cultures attempt to collaborate on a project of mutual interest. The course is structured as a series of animation projects interleaved with screenings and classroom discussions. Mr. Ellman, Mr. Roseman.

Prerequisite: Art 102-103, or by special permission of instructors.

Two 2-hour periods.

Not offered in 2010/11.