Music Department

Professors: Todd Crow (Chair), Blanca Uribe*, Richard Wilson; Associate Professor: Brian Mann; Assistant Professors: Kathryn Libin, Michael Pisania;Visiting Assistant Professors: Thomas Sauer; Lecturers: Arthur D. Champlin III*, Merellyn Gallagher*, Luis Garcia-Renart*, Larry Guy*, Betty-Jean Hagen*, Karen Holvik*, Dana McCurdy*, James R. Osborn*, Robert Osborne*, Linda Quan*, John Solum*; Adjunct Lecturers: Drew Minter*, Viviane Thomas*; Visiting Instructor: Eduardo Navega*; Adjunct Instructors: Cheryl Bishkoff*, Ronald Carbone*, Frank Cassara*, Rachel Rosales*, Rebecca Rosenbaum*, Maria Rivera White*; Adjunct Accompanist: Huguette van Ackere*.

Requirements for Concentration: 13 units of graded work, including Music 105/106, 146/147, 205, 206, 207, 208; one of the following: Music 210, 211; two of the following: Music 232, 234, 236; 2 additional units from history and theory courses which may include not more than one of the following: Music 202, 212, 213, 214, 231, 238; and 11/2 units of performance in the same instrument.

Senior-Year Requirements: 2 units at the 300-level, at least one of them in history or theory.

Requirements for Alternative Concentration in Performance: 13 units of graded work, including Music 105/106, 146/147, 205, 206, 207, 208; one of the following: 210, 211; two of the following: Music 232, 234, 236; 1/2 unit of ensemble; 3 units of performance in the same instrument. A recommendation from the performance instructor and the approval of the department are required.

Senior-Year Requirements for Alternative Concentration in Performance: A recital (302a or b) and 11/2 units of performance at the 300-level. During the semester of the recital, the private lessons must be for 1/2 rather than for 1 unit.

After declaration of major, no work taken NRO may be used to fulfill requirements for either concentration.

Recommendations: A reading knowledge of at least one of the following foreign languages: German, French, Italian. German is strongly recommended. Students planning to concentrate in music will normally elect Music 105/106 in the freshman year and 146/147 in the sophomore year. Majors are encouraged to audition for membership in one of the choral or instrumental organizations sponsored by the department.

Correlate Sequence in Music History: 7 units including Music 105/106 (Harmony), 146/147 (Music History); 2 units of the following: Music 232, 234, 236 (Period Courses); and 1 unit of the following: Music 320, 340 (Seminars).

Correlate Sequence in Music Theory: 7 units including Music 105/106 (Harmony, Music 205 (Advanced Harmony), Music 215 (Composition), Music 210, 211 (Counterpoints), and Music 399 (Independent Work for 1 unit).

Correlate Sequence in Music Composition: 7 units including Music 105/106 (Harmony), Music 215/216 (Composition I), Music 219/220 (Electronic Music), Music 315 (Composition II).

Correlate Sequence in Music and Culture: 7 units including either Music 140 or 141 and either Music 101 or 105; 4 units of the following: Music 201 (Opera), Music 202 (Black Music), Music 212 (World Musics), Music 213 (American Music), Music 214 (History of jazz), Music 231 (Women Making Music), Music 238 (Music in Film), Anthropology/Music 259 (Soundscapes: Anthropology of Music), and Music 399 (Independent Work for 1 unit).

Advisers: The department.

History and Theory

 

I. Introductory

 
101a and b.   Fundamentals of Music
(1)
A beginning study of the elements of music including notation, rhythm and meter, scales and modes, intervals, melody, chord progression, musical terms, and instruments. To facilitate reading skills, class exercises in ear training and sight singing are included. May not be counted in the requirements for concentration.
       Open to all classes. Previous musical training unnecessary.
 
105a/106b.   Harmony
(1)
A study of tonal harmony as found in the music of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Primary emphasis is on writing, including harmonization of bass lines and melodies analysis of representative examples and ear training.
       Open to all classes.
       Prerequisite: each student must demonstrate to the instructor a familiarity with treble and bass clef notation, scales, and basic rhythmic notation.
 
140a, 141b.   Music as a Literature
(1)
A study of selected topics in the history of Western music. Topics dealt with in recent years include: nineteenth-century Italian and German opera, the development of the symphony, musical responses to World War II, and influences of the Middle East in Western music.
       Topic for 140a: to be announced.
       Topic for 141b: The Creative Artist in Society. We study several composers and musicians, among them, Mozart, Robert and Clara Schumann, Tchaikovsky, Cole Porter, and Loretta Lynn, from the perspective of well-known films about these figures, and then compare details of their music and biographies with the manner in which musical genius is popularly presented.
       Open to all classes. Previous musical training not required. May not be counted in the requirements for concentration.
       Two 75-minute periods with an additional section hour.
 
146a/147b.   The History of Western Music
(1)
An introduction to the history of Western music from the Middle Ages to the present for those who can read music and are familiar with musical terminology.
       Open to all classes.
       Three 50-minute periods with an additional section hour.
 
 

II. Intermediate

 
201b.   Opera
(1)
Changing approaches to the drama in music from 1600 to the present.
       Prerequisite: 1 unit in one of the following: art drama Italian, French, German, or English literatures music or by permission. May not be counted in the requirements for concentration.
       Alternate years: offered in 2002/03.
 
202a and b.   Black Music
(1)
(Same as Africana Studies 202) An analytical exploration of the music of certain African and European cultures and their adaptive influences in North America. The course examines the traditional African and European views of music performance practices while exploring their influences in shaping the music of African Americans from the spiritual to modern.
 
205b.   Advanced Harmony
(1)
A continuation of Music 105/106, using more complex harmonic resources and analyzing more extended works.
       Prerequisite: Music 105/106 or by permission.
 
206a.   Basic Musicianship I
(1/2)
Class exercises in ear training, sight singing, dictation, rhythm, clef reading, and elementary conducting.
       Prerequisite: Music 105/106 or by permission.
 
207b.   Basic Musicianship II
(1/2)
A continuation of Music 206 with the addition of such keyboard skills as figured bass realization, improvised accompaniment, and score reading.
       Prerequisite: Music 206.
 
208a.   Basic Musicianship III
(1/2)
A continuation of Music 207, developing aural and keyboard skills to a high degree of proficiency.
       Prerequisite: Music 207.
 
[210a.   Modal Counterpoint]
(1)
A study, through analysis and written exercises, of contrapuntal techniques of the sixteenth century.
       Prerequisite: Music 105/106 or by permission of instructor.
       Alternate years: not offered in 2002/03.
 
211a.   Tonal Counterpoint
(1)
A study, through analysis and written exercises, of contrapuntal techniques of the eighteenth century.
       Prerequisite: Music 105/106 or by permission of instructor.
       Alternate years: offered in 2002/03.
 
[212.   World Musics]
(1)
(Same as Anthropology 212) Studies in non-European musical cultures.
       Prerequisite: 1 unit in one of the following: anthropology, Asian Studies, music, religion, or by permission of instructor.
       Alternate years: not offered in 2002/03.
 
213b.   American Music
(1)
The study of folk, popular, and art music in American life from 1700 to the present and their relationship to other facets of America's historical development and cultural growth.
       Prerequisite: 1 unit in one of the following: music studies in American history, art, or literature or by permission of instructor.
       Alternate years: offered in 2002/03.
 
[214.   History of American Jazz]
(1)
An investigation of the whole range of jazz history, from its beginning around the turn of the century to the present day. Among the figures to be examined are: Scott Joplin, "Jelly Roll" Morton, Louis Armstrong, Bessie Smith, Duke Ellington, Fletcher Henderson, Count Basie, Thomas "Fats" Waller, Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, Charles Mingus, and Miles Davis.
       Prerequisite: 1 unit in one of the following: music, studies in American history, art, or literature or by permission of instructor.
       Alternate years: not offered in 2002/03.
 
215a/216b.   Composition I
(1)
Creative work in twentieth-century idioms. Analysis of selected works study of instrumental resources.
       Prerequisite: Music 105/106 or by permission of instructor.
       If a senior project in composition is planned, the student should elect Music 215/216 in the sophomore year and Music 315/316 in the junior year.
 
219a/220b.   Electronic Music
(1)
A practical exploration of electronic music, composition, and production techniques, inluding tape recording and manipulation, analog synthesis, MIDI sequencing, digital synthesis, sampling, digital recording and editing, signal processing and mixing. Compositional and creative aspects will be emphasized with extensive lab time provided for student projects.
       Prerequisite: by permission of instructor.
 
231a.   Women Making Music
(1)
(Same as Women's Studies 231) A study of women's involvement in Western and non-Western musical cultures. Drawing on recent work in feminist musicology and ethnomusicology, the course studies a wide range of musics created by women, both past and present. It explores such topics as musical instruments and gender, voice and embodiment, access to training and performance opportunities, and representations of women musicians in art and literature. Ms. Libin and Ms. Dunn.
       Prerequisite: one unit in music, or women's studies, or by permission of instructor.
       Alternate years: offered in 2002/03.
 
232b.   Studies in Music of the Medieval/Renaissance Periods
(1)
There are two options for this course: topics in the musical style of the Middle Ages (monophonic and polyphonic genres to 1450) or in the styles of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries (Latin and vernacular forms). May be repeated for credit if the topic has changed.
       Topic for 2002/03: Medieval.
       Prerequisites: Music 146/147 or by permission of instructor.
 
234a.   Studies in Music of the Baroque/Classical Periods
(1)
There are two options for this course: topics in music from 1600 to 1750 (the Italian stile moderno and its dissemination) or in the music of the early eighteenth century through the early nineteenth century (Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven). May be repeated for credit if the topic has changed.
       Topic for 2002/03: Classical.
       Prerequisites: Music 146/147 or by permission of instructor.
 
[236b.   Studies in Music of the Nineteenth/Twentieth Centuries]
(1)
There are two options for this course: topics in the musical style of the nineteenth century or from the late nineteenth century to the present. May be repeated for credit if the topic has changed.
       Prerequisites: Music 146/147 or by permission of instructor.
       Not offered in 2002/03.
 
[238b.   Music in Film]
(1)
(Same as Film 238b) A study of music in the cinema from 1895 to the present. The course focuses on the expressive, formal, and semiotic functions that film music serves, either as sound experienced by the protagonists, or as another layer of commentary to be heard only by the viewer, or some mixture of the two. Composers studied range from Prokofiev, Copland and Walton (known best for their non-film scores) to Tiomkin, Rozsa, Steiner and Herrmann (specialists in the field). Contemporary figures such as John Williams and Danny Elfman are considered.
       Two 75-minute periods, plus additional film screenings
       Prerequisites: one course in music (not performance) or film.
       Alternate years: not offered in 2002/03.
 
259.   Soundscapes: Anthropology of Music
(1)
(Same as Anthropology 259)
 
290a or b.   Field Work
(1/2 or 1)
 
298a or b.   Independent Work
(1/2 or 1)
Special projects in theory, history, or performance which supplement the curriculum.
       Open to qualified students with permission of department.
 
 

III. Advanced

 
302a or b.   Senior Project
(1/2)
A paper, composition, or recital. Proposals for the project must be submitted for departmental approval by the end of the junior year.
 
315a.   316
[316b.] Composition II
(1)
       Further work in original composition analysis of examples illustrating current practice.
       Permission of the instructor required qualification to be determined by submission in advance of original work.
       Prerequisites: Music 105/106 and 215/216 or equivalent.
 
320b.   Seminar
(1)
Seminar concentrating on the work of one composer.
       Prerequisites: Music 105/106 146/147 any two of the following: Music 232, 234, 236 or by permission of instructor
 
340a.   Advanced Studies in the History of Music
(1)
An analysis of selected compositions from various periods of music history.
       Prerequisites: Music 105/106 146/147 any two of the following: Music 232, 234, 236 or by permission of instructor.
 
[381b.   The Decadent Imagination at the Fin de Siècle]
(1)
(Same as College Course 381b.)
       Not offered in 2002/03.
 
399a or b.   Senior Independent Work
(1/2 or 1)
Special projects in theory, history, or performance which supplement the curriculum.
       Open to qualified students with permission of department.
 

Performance

 

Auditions are required for both credited and uncredited study and are arranged at the beginning of each semester for students who register for the desired course. Each course in performance includes a program of literature suited to the individual student, and requires a reasonable improvement in technical proficiency and interpretative understanding for continuation.

Correlative courses in theory or history (see Individual Instruction below) should be begun as early as possible, but no later than the third semester of credited study.

Enrollment is limited in each area of instruction. Music majors and students studying for credit are given preference. Beginners are accepted as schedules permit.

Fees: See section on fees. Scholarships to cover charges are made available through the Office of Financial Aid and are granted only for credited study. Individual instruction is given as follows:


Piano (060, 160, 260, 360): Mr. Crow, Ms. Rivera-White, Mr. Sauer, Miss Uribe. 
Organ (061,161, 261, 361): Mrs. Gallagher. 
Harpsichord (062, 162, 262, 362): Mrs. Gallagher. 
Voice (063, 163, 263, 363): Ms. Holvik, Mr. Minter, Mr. Osborne, Ms. Rosales, Ms. Thomas. 
Violin (064, 164, 264, 364): Ms. Hagen, Ms. Quan. 
Viola (065, 165, 265, 365): Mr. Carbone. 
Violoncello (066, 166, 266, 366): Mr. Garcia-Renart, Ms. Seligman. 
Double Bass (067, 167, 267, 367): Mr. Pappas. 
Classical Guitar (068, 168, 268, 368): Mr. Champlin. 
Harp (069, 169, 269, 369): Mr. Owens. 
Flute (070, 170, 270, 370): Mr. Solum. 
Oboe (071, 171, 271, 371): Ms. Bishkoff. 
Clarinet (072, 172, 272, 372): Mr. Guy. 
Bassoon (073, 173, 273, 373): Ms. Romano. 
French Horn (074, 174, 274, 374): Mr. Karr. 
Trumpet (075, 175, 275, 375): Mr. Osborn. 
Trombone (076, 176, 276, 376): Mr. Bellino. 
Tuba (077, 177, 277, 377): Instructor to be announced. 
Percussion (078, 178, 278, 378): Mr. Cassara. 
Other Instruments (079, 179, 279, 379): Instructor to be announced.

Note: Performance levels are described under numbers 000, 100, 200, 300. Credited instruction in piano, for example, should be elected as 160; whereas uncredited study should be elected as 060.

The department will attempt to arrange instruction in certain instruments not listed above. Students wishing such instruction should consult with the chair of the department.

 

Individual Instruction

 

Ensembles

In the following five ensembles (jazz ensemble, orchestra, choir, Women\'s Chorus, and Madrigal Singers) the first semester is an uncredited prerequisite for the second: credited study is offered only in the second semester. Students wishing to enroll for credit in the second semester (the 150 series) must register for the uncredited prerequisite (the 050 series) in the first semester. No student may exceed 2 units of credit in his or her four years at Vassar. Membership is open to all classes and assumes a full year commitment. Admission is by audition. May be counted in performance requirements for concentration in music only as specified under Alternative Concentration in Performance.

 
050a, 051b, 151b.   Jazz Ensemble
(0 or 1/2)
The jazz ensemble performs literature ranging from the Big Band Era to jazz-rock fusion. Improvisation and ensemble playing in a jazz style are featured. Mr. Osborn.
       One meeting per week.
 
052a, 053, 153.   Orchestra
(0 or 1/2)
The 60-member orchestra performs masterworks of the symphonic literature. Mr. Navega.
       Open to all students by audition.
       Two meetings per week.
 
054a, 055b, 155b.   Women's Chorus
(0 or 1/2)
The Women's Chorus is an ensemble of 30-50 women that studies and performs repertoire from the medieval period to the present. The ensemble presents concerts on campus, and occasionally travels to perform with other choirs.
       Open to all students by audition. Ms. Rosenbaum.
       Two meetings per week.
 
056a, 057b, 157b.   Choir
(0 or 1/2)
The choir is a mixed ensemble of between 40 and 60 voices that studies and performs choral/orchestral and a cappella literature for a larger chorus from the Renaissance through the present. The choir performs on campus and occasionally makes concert tours. Mr. Kamm.
       Open to all students by audition.
       Two meetings per week.
 
058a, 059b, 159b.   Madrigal Singers
(0 or 1/2)
The Madrigal Singers is a select mixed ensemble of between 10 and 20 voices which studies and performs literature for solo and chamber vocal ensemble. Mr. Kamm.
       One meeting per week.
 
251a, b.   Chamber Music
(1/2)
The study and performance of selected works from the ensemble repertoire of instrumental or vocal mediums or their combinations. Mr. Garcia-Renart.
       Open to qualified students with the permission of the instructor. No student may exceed 2 units of this credit in his or her four years at Vassar. May be counted in performance requirements for concentration in music only as specified under the alternative concentration in performance. No fee.
       One 50-minute period. Unscheduled.
 
254a or b.   Opera Workshop
(1/2)
The study and performance of selected operatic repertoire. Open to qualified students by audition.
       No student may exceed 2 units of this credit in his or her four years at Vassar. May be counted in performance requirements for concentration in music only as ensemble credit specified under alternative concentration in performance.