Russian Studies

Professor: Alexis Klimoff; Assistant Professor: Dan Ungurianu;Visiting Instructor: Elizabeth Papazian.

Requirements for Concentration: 10 units beyond introductory language; including 331/332 or equivalent, 135/235, 152/252, plus 3 units in literature at the 300-level.

Senior-Year Requirements: 3 units of advanced course work except for students returning from a full-year JYA program in Russia, who may satisfy this requirement with 2 units of 300-level work. Senior thesis (300) is required only of students who are candidates for departmental honors.

Recommendations: Study of the language should be started in the freshman year. Study at an accredited summer school is strongly urged. JYA in Russia through approved exchange programs.

A Teaching Certification program is available.

Advisers: The department.

Correlate Sequence in Russian Studies: Four semesters of the Russian language (or equivalent) and three additional courses in culture, literature and/or language, one of which must be at the 300-level.


I. Introductory

105a-106b. Elementary Russian (11/2)

The essentials of grammar with emphasis on the development of oral-aural proficiency. Ms. Papazian.

Open to all classes. Five 50-minute periods plus two hours of oral practice.

135a. The Russian Classics: The Great Realists of the Nineteenth (1)
Century

The great tradition of Russian literature with its emphasis on the ultimate existential and moral questions. Selected works by such nineteenth-century masters as Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, and Dostoevsky. Mr. Ungurianu.

Open to all classes. Readings and lectures in English. Russian majors see 235a.

Three 50-minute periods.

152b. The Russian Modernists (1)

Representative works of major twentieth-century Russian writers, with emphasis on those who broke with the realist tradition of the nineteenth century. Mr. Klimoff.

Open to all classes. Readings and lectures in English. Russian majors see 252b.

Three 50-minute periods.

165a. The Faces of Russia (1)

A survey of selected features of the prerevolutionary cultural tradition within a historical framework. Topics explored include folklore, the religious world of medieval Russia with special emphasis on art and architecture, the inroads of secular culture, the challenges of Westernization, and the emergence of national traditions in literature, art, and music. Given in English. Mr. Klimoff.

Satisfies college requirement for a Freshman Course.

Two 75-minute periods plus one 2-hour screening.

169b. Utopia in Power: Russian Culture in the Twentieth Century (1)

A survey of modern Russian culture in its historical context. Topics include cultural and social revolutions, the Red Avant-Garde, Socialist Realism, the creation of the New Man, the Great Terror, the totalitarian system and its collapse, the dissident movement, ethnic identity and ethnic conflicts, Russian rock and pop music, post-Communist Russia. Mr. Ungurianu.

Open to all classes. All readings and discussions are in English.

Three 50-minute periods.

171b. Russia and the Short Story (1)

In this course, having briefly considered the specifics of the short story as a literary genre, we proceed to read, discuss and analyze selected short story masterpieces by Pushkin, Gogoal, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Chekhov and others. The department.

This course satisfies the Freshman Course Requirement.

Two 75-minute periods.

II. Intermediate

210a-211b. Intermediate Russian (1)

Review and completion of basics of grammar, and analysis of more complex grammatical phenomena through the study of literary texts, historical and newspaper texts, composition, and discussion. Mr. Ungurianu.

Prerequisite: Russian 105-106 or permission of instructor.

Four 50-minute periods plus one hour of oral practice.

231b. Russian Screen and Stage (1)

Aspects of Russian film, drama and performing arts.

Topic for 2000-2001: The Birth of Modern Theater: Russian Drama and Theatrical Art, 1890s-1930s. Innovation in drama, including works by Chekhov, Gorky, Blok, Mayakovsky, Bulgakov. Groundbreaking developments in staging and directing: from the psychological realism of Stanislavsky's Method to the avant-garde experimentation of Meyerhold and the revolutionary spectacles of Agitprop. Mr. Ungurianu.

Prerequisite: Sophomore or above, or one of the following courses: Russian 135, 152, 165, 169, or Drama 101. All readings and discussions in English.

Three 50-minute periods.

235a. The Russian Classics: The Great Realists of the Nineteenth (1)
Century

Individually designed for Russian majors and other students with some knowledge of Russian. Students in this course attend the same lectures and discussions as those in Russian 152, but are required to do part of the work in Russian.

By permission of instructor.

252b. The Russian Modernists (1)

Individually designed for Russian majors and other students with some knowledge of Russian. Students in this course attend the same lectures and discussions as those in Russian 152, but are required to do part of the work in Russian.

By permission of instructor.

267a. Culture and Ideology (1)

In Eastern Europe in generaland in Russia in particularthe intense impact of ideology on culture has been experienced arguably more than in any other European societies. The intersections of ideology and culture are explored in depth, with a specific focus that varies based on the course.

Topic for 2000/01: The Russian Avant-Garde 1910-1935: Visual and Literary Art. A historical survey of the major components of the Russian Avant-Garde movement, including Futurism, Cubo-Futurism, Alogism, Suprematism, and Constructivism, with particular attention to the synthesis of visual and literary concepts. The interaction with parallel developments in Western Europe is also examined. Significant use is made of slides, film, and paper reproductions. In English. Mr. Firtich.

Prerequisite: Sophomore or above, or one of the following courses: Russian 165 or 169, History 121, or Political Science 160. Readings and discussions in English.

Two 75-minute periods.

[271b. Focus on Literature] (1)

Aspects of the Russian literary tradition-including authors, genres, and thematic emphases-and the place of this tradition in world literature.

Topic for 2000/01: The Short Story: Theory and Practice. In this course we explore the short story as a genre, beginning with its possible origins in folk and fairy tales and continuing through the twentieth century; we consider both classics of the European tradition (Poe, Maupassant, O.Henry) and the Russian tradition (Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Zamiatin, Zoshchenko, Kharms, Nabokov, Tolstaya). Each week we read several short stories, with a complementary work (or works) of criticismon narrative or prose fiction, on prose genres, on particular authors or storieswith the intent of relating back to the question of defining the short story as a category. The critics discussed include Russian literary theorists such as Propp, Shklovsky, Eikhenbaum, Bakhtin, and Lotman, as well as non-Russians, such as Todorov, Benjamin, and Lacan. Ms. Papazian.

Prerequisite: Sophomore or above, or one unit in Russian, English, or another national literature, including AP standing. Readings and discussion in English.

Two 75-minute periods.

298. Independent Work (1/2 or 1)

Program to be worked out in consultation with an instructor. The department.


III. Advanced

Prerequisite for all advanced courses: Russian 210-211. Additional prerequisites indicated where appropriate.

300a or b. Senior Thesis (1)

331a/332b. Advanced Russian (1)

A course designed to increase all aspects of Russian proficiency. Includes readings on a wide range of topics, discussion, oral reports, stylistic analysis, written assignments, and review of persistent grammatical difficulties. Mr. Klimoff.

351b. Seminar on Russian Culture (1)

Advanced seminar on Russian culture. Designed for majors and students with sufficient knowledge of Russian.

Topic for 2000-200 1: The Myth of St. Petersburg. In this course, we explore the myth of the city of St. Petersburg, the Imperial Russian capital, founded by Peter the Great in the early eighteenth century as a "window on Europe." The city has been seen to embody all of the contradictions of Russia-East and West, imperial grandeur and the pathos of the little man, nature and civilization, free will and fate. We consider the semiotics of space in St. Petersburg through careful reading of selected literary texts, both prose and poetryPushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Blok, Bely, Akhmatova, Mandelstam, Brodskyand works of literary/cultural criticism, in particular by Bakhtin and Lotman. Ms. Papazian.

Readings and discussions in Russian.

Prerequisite: Russian 331 or permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

373a. Seminar on Russian Literature (1)

Focused analysis of an author, work, theme, genre, or literary school in the nineteenth or twentieth century. Mr. Klimoff.

Topic for 2000-2001: Pushkin and the Golden Age of Russian Poetry. Representative poems by Pushkin, Lermontov, Tiutchev, and others.

Conducted in Russian.

Prerequisite: Russian 331 or equivalent.

One 3-hour period.

399. Senior Independent Work (1/2 or 1)

Program to be worked out in consultation with an instructor. The department.