Psychology

Professors: N. Jay Bean, Gwen J. Broudea, Anne P. Constantinoplea, Randolph Corneliusb, Janet Gray (Chair), Kenneth Livingston, Richard LowryabAssociate Professors: Janet K. Andrews, Carol Christensen, Carolyn Palmer, Stephen Sadowsky; Assistant Professors: Stephen Clark, Erik Coats, Jeffrey Cynxab, Jannay Morrow, Debra Zeifman; Visiting Assistant Professor: Deborah Gatins; Lecturer:Julie Riess (Director of the Wimpfheimer Nursery School); Adjunct Instructor:Nicholas deLeeuw.

Absent on leave, first semester.Absent on leave, second semester. ab Absent on leave for the year.

Requirements for Concentration: 11 units in psychology including Psychology 105 or 106 and 270 (by permission of the department, either or both of these requirements may be met by examination); two units from list A (Psychology 202, 205, 260), two units from list B (Psychology 211*, 212, 213*, 214, 215*), and one laboratory course (Psychology 271, 272, 273, 275*, 278), which students are expected to take by the end of their junior year; two seminars at the 300-level in the senior year. A minimum of 9 graded units is required for the major. For junior transfer students, at least 6 units must be graded. Biopsychology 201 and Cognitive Science 100 and 375 may be counted toward the major. Upon departmental approval, 1 unit in appropriate courses in other departments may be applied toward the required 11. (*Note: Cognitive Science 100 is a prerequisite for these courses.)

NRO: No course above the 100-level taken NRO may be counted toward the requirements of the psychology major.

Senior-Year Requirement: Two 300-level seminars. 1 unit of Cognitive Science 375 may be taken to satisfy this requirement. No more than one Advanced Special Studies course may be included in this requirement.

Recommendation: Because of the relevance of cognitive science to contemporary psychology, students are encouraged to take Cognitive Science 100.

It is recommended that students planning to concentrate in psychology consult a department adviser as soon as possible to plan appropriate sequences of courses.

Advisers: The department.


I. Introductory

105a or b. Introduction to Psychology: A survey (1)

This course is designed to introduce the student to fundamental psychological processes, their nature and development, and contemporary methods for their study through a survey of the major research areas in the field. Areas covered include the biological and evolutionary bases of thought and behavior, motivation and emotion, learning, memory, thinking, personality, and social psychology. Significant work in the course is devoted to developing skills in quantitative analysis. Students are expected to participate in up to a maximum of three hours of psychological research during the semester. Psychology 105 may NOT be taken if Psychology 106 has already been taken. The department.

Open to all classes. Enrollment limited.

106a or b. Introduction to Psychology: Special topics (1)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the science of psychology by exploration in depth of a specific research area. Regardless of the special topic, all sections include exposure to core concepts in the biological and evolutionary foundations of thought and behavior, learning, cognition, and social processes. Significant work in the course is devoted to developing skills in quantitative analysis. Students are expected to participate in up to a maximum of three hours of psychological research during the semester. Psychology 106 may NOT be taken if Psychology 105 has already been taken. The department.

Open to all classes. Enrollment limited.


II. Intermediate

Prerequisite for all 200-level courses: Psychology 105, 106, or demonstration by examination of equivalent background. Students who have received a 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement test, or those with transfer credit, should consult with the department chair before registering in 200-level courses. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors may use 105 or 106 as a corequisite by permission of instructor.

202a or b. Principles of Development (1)

The study of principles and processes in developmental psychology, surveying changes in physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development during the life span. Major theoretical orientations to the growing person are illustrated by empirical material and supplemented by periodic observations of children and adolescents in natural settings. Ms. Broude, Mr. Livingston, Ms. Palmer, Ms. Zeifman.

205a or b. Principles of Social Psychology (1)

The study of the individual under social influences, including such topics as attitude formation and change, prosocial behavior, aggression, social influence processes, group dynamics, attribution theory, and interpersonal communication processes. Mr. Coats, Mr. Cornelius, Ms. Morrow.

211a. Perception and Action (1)

(Same as Cognitive Science 211)

Prerequisite: Cognitive Science 100.

212a or b. Principles of Learning and Behavior (1)

A survey of major principles that determine the acquistion and modification of animal and human behavior. Topics include the evolution of behavior, associative and nonassociative conditioning, ethology and sociobiology, specialized learning systems, cultural and social learning, and the application of learning principles to such areas as clinical and forensic psychology. Mr. Sadowsky.

213a or b. Language (1)

(Same as Cognitive Science 213)

Prerequisite: Cognitive Science 100.

214a or b. Principles of Physiological Psychology (1)

The role of neural mechanisms in behavior. Topics covered include motivational and sensory mechanisms and the physiological correlates of learning. Mr. Bean, Ms. Christensen, Mr. Clark, Ms. Gray.

215a or b. Knowledge and Cognition (1)

(Same as Cognitive Science 215)

Prerequisite: Cognitive Science 100.

236a Early Childhood Development: Observation and Research (1) Application (1)

(Same as Education 236) What differentiates the behavior of one young child from that of another? What characteristics do preschool children have in common? This course provides students with direct experience in applying contemporary theory and research to the understanding of an individual child. Topics include attachment; temperament; parent, sibling, and peer relationships; theories of mind; language development, humor, and language play; fantasy/reality distinctions; the self and moral development; and social categories. Each student completes a comprehensive study of one child in the Nursery School, based on detailed, extended observation and the application of research findings from the developmental literature.

Prerequisite: Psychology 202 and permission of instructor

One 2-hour period; 4 hours of laboratory participation

237b Early Childhood Education: Theory and Practice (1)

(Same as Education 237) What is the connection between a textbook description of preschool development and what teachers do every day in the preschool classroom? This course examines curriculum development based on contemporary theory and research in early childhood. The emphasis is on implementing developmental and educational research to create optimal learning environments for young children. Major theories of cognitive development are considered and specific attention is given to the literatures on memory development; concepts and categories; cognitive strategies; peer teaching; early reading, math, and scientific literacy; and technology in early childhood classrooms.

Prerequisite: Psychology 202 and permission of instructor

One 2-hour period; 4 hours of laboratory participation

260a or b. Personality (1)

A study of the development, dynamics, and organization of the normal personality with critical evaluation of theories of personality, processes of personality development, and related empirical contributions. Ms. Constantinople, Ms. Gatins, Ms. Morrow.

Open to freshmen only by permission of instructor.

262a or b. Abnormal Psychology (1)

A survey of the nature, origins, and treatment of major psychological disturbances. The course integrates psychodynamic, biological, and behavioral conceptions of mental disorders. Topics include schizophrenia, autism, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, sociopathy, and childhood disorders. Ms. Gatins, Ms. Morrow, Mr. Sadowsky.

Prerequisite: One List-A course (Psychology 202, 205, 260) and one List-B course (Psychology 211, 212, 213, 214, 215) and permission of instructor.

270a or b. Statistics and Experimental Design (1)

Methods and principles of statistical analysis, and principles of research design applicable to psychology and related fields of empirical investigation. Descriptive and inferential statistics; concepts of validity and reliability; basic concepts of probability theory, sampling theory, and sampling distributions; principles of hypothesis testing; z-tests and t-tests; correlation and linear regression, analysis of variance; chi-square and other nonparametric procedures. Exercises in research design; in the collection and analysis of data and the interpretation of results; and in the use of computers for performing complex analyses. Prerequisite for all laboratory courses. Ms. Andrews.

271a or b. Methods and Issues in Developmental Psychology (1)

Problems and procedures in developmental research. The course considers conceptual issues in the design of developmental research, basic observational techniques, and problems of reliability. Students work with children of different ages in both laboratory and naturalistic settings. Basic principles of work with video tape and simple laboratory equipment (e.g., event recorders) are included. Mr. Livingston, Ms. Palmer, Ms. Zeifman.

Prerequisites: Psychology 270 and 202. Regular laboratory work. Enrollment limited.

272a or b. Methods and Issues in Social and Personality Psychology (1)

A survey of the issues and methods involved in the conduct of research in personality and social psychology. Topics include: the generation of research hypotheses; collection, analysis, and evaluation of data; and communication of results. Observational, questionnaire, and experimental approaches are considered. The focus is on the development of skills necessary for evaluating and conducting research. Laboratory projects are required. Mr. Coats, Ms. Constantinople, Mr.Cornelius, Ms. Morrow.

Prerequisites: Psychology 270 and 205 or 260. Regular laboratory work. Enrollment limited.

273a or b. Methods and Issues in Learning and Behavior (1)

A study of experimental and observational methods in learning and behavior, including the design, analysis and reporting of field and laboratory work. Topics may include ethology, conditioned and unconditioned learning in invertebrates and vertebrates, social behavior, aggression, computer models, and biofeedback.

Prerequisites: Psychology 270 and 212, or permission of the instructor.

Regular laboratory work. Enrollment limited.

275b. Methods in Cognitive Science (1)

(Same as Cognitive Science 275)

278a or b. Methods and Issues in Physiological Psychology (1)

The study of experimental methodology in physiological psychology. Topics include experimental design, analysis of behavioral change following stimulation or ablation of the central nervous system, and principles of bioelectrical recording and analysis. Regular laboratory work utilizes lesion-making, stimulation, recording, and histological techniques. Mr. Bean, Ms. Christensen, Mr. Clark, Ms. Gray.

Prerequisites: Psychology 270 and 214.

Regular laboratory work. Enrollment limited.

290a or b. Field Work (1/2 or 1)

Individual or group field projects or internships, with prior approval of the adviser and the instructor who will supervise the work. May be elected during the college year or during the summer. The department.

298a, b. Independent Work (1/2 or 1)

Individual or group studies with prior approval of the adviser and of the instructor who will supervise the work. May be elected during the college year or during the summer. The department.


III. Advanced

Open to juniors and seniors. For majors, satisfactory completion of a psychology laboratory course (271, 272, 273, 275, 278), and permission of the instructor, are prerequisite for all 300-level courses. Nonmajors should consult the instructor.

300a and/or b. Thesis (1-2)

Open to seniors by permission of instructor.

Prerequisite: Psychology 298 or 399.

325a or b. Seminar in Advanced Developmental Psychology (1)

Seminar in current issues, research, and theory in developmental psychology. Ms. Broude, Mr. Livingston, Ms. Palmer, Ms. Zeifman.

Prerequisite: Psychology 202 or 271.

335a or b. Seminar in Psychopathology (1)

An intensive study of research and theory concerning the nature, origins, and treatment of major psychological disorders. Topics can vary from year to year but may include the schizophrenias, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, and childhood disorders. Ms. Gatins, Ms. Morrow, Mr. Sadowsky.

Prerequisite: Psychology 262.

342a or b. Seminar in Physiological Psychology (1)

Analysis of selected topics in physiological psychology. Topics vary from year to year but may include learning, memory, human neuropsychology, neuropharmacology, psychopharmacology, sensory processes, emotion, and motivation. Mr. Bean, Ms. Christensen, Mr. Clark, Ms. Gray.

Prerequisite: Psychology 214 or 278.

[345a or b. Seminar in Gender and Psychology] (1)

The different ways in which psychologists have studied the influence of sex and gender on behavior are examined. The adequacy of existing theoretical and empirical models to account for the complex interactions of biological, cognitive, and social factors in producing or not producing sex-related differences in behavior is evaluated. Recent feminist critiques of scientific process and method and suggested revisions are explored. Ms. Constantinople, Ms. Gray.

Prerequisites: Psychology 214; 202 or 260.

Not offered in 1999/00.

350a or b. Seminar in Social Psychology (1)

An intensive study of selected topics in social psychology. Emphasis is placed on current theories, issues, and research areas. Mr. Coats, Mr. Cornelius, Ms. Morrow.

Prerequisite: Psychology 205 or 272.

355a or b. Seminar in Comparative Psychology (1)

The study of animal behavior and the science of ethology. Topics include: the evolution of behavior; sexual behavior; language and communication; aggression; dominance; and territoriality. Emphasis is on the relevance of such findings for a better understanding of the animal origins and nature of human behavior Ms.Broude.

Prerequisite: Psychology 212 or Biology 340.

360a or b. Seminar in Personality Theory (1)

An intensive study of the work of a limited number of personality theorists. Selection of theories to be studied are made jointly by instructor and students and vary with the backgrounds and interests of both. Ms. Constantinople, Ms. Gatins.

Prerequisite: Psychology 260 or 272.

378a or b. Seminar on States of Consciousness (1)

A consideration of conditions giving rise to disruptions of awareness and their implications for behavioral integration. Topics serving as discussion areas are: sleep and dreaming; hypnosis and hypnagogic phenomena; drug behavior and biochemistry; psychopathologic states; fugues and amnesias; cerebral damage; pain; and the process of dying. Mr. Bean, Ms. Christensen.

Prerequisite: Psychology 214.

399a, b. Senior Independent Work (1/2 or 1)

Individual or group studies with prior approval of the adviser and of the instructor who will supervise the work. May be elected during the college year or during the summer. The department.