Physical Education and Dance

Professors: Kathy Campbell, Jeanne Periolate Czula (Director of Dance), Roman Czula (Chair), Andrew Jennings (Athletic Director); Assistant Professors: Judy Finerghty, Lisl Prater-Lee, Stephen Rooks; Instructors: Andrew Barlow, Andrew Carter, Jonathan Penn, Richard Sipperly, Craig Thorpe-Clark; Lecturers: Tony Brown (Sports Information Director, Steve Buonfiglio (Intramural Director), Mike Dutton (Assistant Athletic Director), Louise McCleary (Associate Athletic Director), Chris Parsons (Assistant Athletic Director); Visiting Instructors: Abby Saxon*, Deborah Tacon*.

* Part time.

Athletic Teams and Head Coaches

Baseball - Andrew Barlow

Men's Basketball - Mike Dutton

Women's Basketball - Steve Buonfiglio

Men's and Women's Rowing - Andrew Carter

Men's and Women's Cross Country - Andrew Barlow

Men's and Women's Fencing - Matt Lampell

Field Hockey - Judy Finerghty

Women's Lacrosse - Judy Finerghty

Men's Lacrosse - Richard Sipperly

Men's and Women's Rugby - Tony Brown

Men's Soccer - Chris Parsons

Women's Soccer - Richard Sipperly

Men's and Women's Squash - Craig Thorpe-Clark

Men's and Women's Swimming and Diving - Lisi Prater-Lee

Women's Tennis - Kathy Campbell

Men's Tennis - Roman Czula

Men's and Women's Volleyball - Jonathan Penn

Courses are offered by the physical education and dance department for 1/2 unit of academic credit with the exception of 110, 264, 265, 266, 267, and 390, which receive 1 unit.

The maximum amount of credit, exclusive of dance, that may be counted toward the degree is 2 units. Most of these courses are offered for ungraded credit for a 13-week term. Exceptions are 110 and the following dance courses which may be graded: 264, 265, 266, 267, 364, 365, 366, 367, 394, 395, 396, 397. Course content will include: analysis and practice of techniques for the development of skill; understanding and application of mechanical and aesthetic principles; anatomy and physiology where appropriate. Outside reading and practical work are required. The department reserves the right to drop a student whose skill level is not appropriate to the class.

A standard of achievement set by the instructor must be met, as well as demonstrated improvement in skill and knowledge of the activity. Regular class participation is essential, as well as completion of all required reading and outside assignments. Advancement to a higher level of the same activity is not automatic: the instructor's recommendation is necessary. Evaluation may take the form of skill testing, written work, and/or examinations.


Dance


I. Introductory

160a and b. Beginning Ballet (1/2)

Introduction to the fundamentals of the ballet class; includes the basic exercises for the barre and centre. Ms. Periolat.

165a and b. Advanced Beginning Ballet (1/2)

A course for the student who has had some basic training in ballet; includes the entire barre and centre with some emphasis on Vaganova vs. Cecchetti terminology. Ms. Periolat.

166a and b. Low Intermediate Ballet I (1/2)

A course for the student who has good beginner training (complete barre and some centre work). The emphasis is on the development of "steps" for centre work. 
Ms. Periolat.

Permission of the instructor.

167a and b. Low Intermediate Ballet II (1/2)

A continuation of the development of "steps" for centre work. Ms. Periolat.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

170b. Movement Analysis (1/2)

This course focuses on the study of movement in a different way than the learning of a particular discipline, as in dance, sports, or martial arts. It is designed to help students increase body awareness in all activities and discover personal habits and movement preferences. Methods of observing, analyzing, and recording movement are explored. Students are introduced to functional anatomy, the Alexander Technique, Laban Movement Analysis and Dance Therapy, and participate in an eclectic mix of movement experiences including games, exercises, and improvisations. Ms. Tacon.

174a. Beginning Jazz Dance (1/2)

Jazz dance, which can be defined as "popular dance of the times", incorporates many different styles and eras of dance including cakewalk, charleston, lindy-hop and swing, blues, tap, ballroom, rock and roll and hip-hop as well as use of modern and ballet vocabulary. There is an emphasis on body isolations, pulsing movements, rhythm patterns, weightedness and momentum. The class includes warm-up, traveling sequences and a final combination. Ms. Saxon.

175b. Advanced Beginning Jazz (1/2)

Continued work on the fundamentals taught in 174. More demanding combinations. Ms. Saxon.

194a and b. Beginning Modern Dance (1/2)

This class presents an introduction to the basic movement ideas which are the cornerstones of American modern dance, spirals, contractions, falls and rebounds, suspension, turns and weight transference. Floor work, center work, and traveling sequences are taught. Throughout the term students receive printouts of biographies and histories of the artists and companies involved in modern dance. Mr. Rooks.

195a and b Advanced Beginning Modern (1/2)

This class continues and develops the basic movement ideas introduced in Beginning Modern. Instructor to be announced.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

196a and b. Low Intermediate Modern (1/2)

Continued work in the fundamentals of American modern dance movement from advanced beginning. Combinations become more demanding and students are introduced to etudes in various modern styles and techniques. Instructor to be announced.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.


II. Intermediate

215a. Dance Composition and the Craft of Choreography (1/2)

An introduction to the basic elements of dance composition. Body space, stage space, time, form, props, and music are incorporated in the creative process resulting in the student's own dynamic studies.

One hour lecture, 2-hour lab.

264a and b. Intermediate Ballet I (1)

Development of the classical ballet syllabus at the intermediate level. This course includes three 11/2-hour sessions per week with an added arranged hour to be used for work in one of the following areas: pointe, terminology, theory, men's class, or adagio (when possible). Ms. Periolat.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

265a and b. Intermediate Ballet II (1)

Further development of the classical ballet syllabus at the intermediate level. 
Ms. Periolat.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

266a and b. Intermediate Ballet III (1)

Further development of the classical ballet syllabus at the intermediate level. Ms. Periolat.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

267a and b. Intermediate Ballet IV (1)

Further development of the classical ballet syllabus at the intermediate level. 
Ms. Periolat.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

274a. Intermediate Jazz I (1/2)

Continued work in the different styles and eras of jazz dance. Traveling sequences and techniques become more demanding as does the final dance combination. Ms. Saxon. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

275b. Intermediate Jazz II (1/2)

Continued work at the intermediate level of jazz technique including traditional styles such as Luigi and Fosse as well as moving on to more contemporary styles of the later 20th century. Ms. Saxon.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

290a and b. Field Work (1/2 or 1)

To be elected in consultation with the adviser and field work office.

294a and b. Intermediate Modern Dance I (1/2)

Exercises and phrases continue from Physical Education 195. Material builds in complexity and technical demand. Mr. Rooks.

Prerequisite: Physical Education 195 or permission of instructor.

295a and b. Intermediate Modern Dance II (1/2)

Continuation of work from Physical Education 294. New movement concepts are added. Mr. Rooks.

Prerequisite: Physical Education 294 or permission of instructor.

298a and b. Independent Work (1/2 or 1)

Permission granted by the chair of the department for the study of a topic in depth.


Reading Course

297a and b. History of the Dance (1/2)

Instructor to be announced.


III. Advanced

364a. Repertory Dance Theatre I (1/2)

Performance in repertory of American master choreographers. Works by students and faculty are also offered. In addition, several workshops in new student choreography are given throughout the year. (Auditions for intermediate and advanced students are held the first week in September.) Mr. Rooks.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

365b. Repertory Dance Theatre II (1/2)

Mr. Rooks, Ms. Tacon.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

366a. Repertory Dance Theatre III (1/2)

Mr. Rooks, Ms. Tacon.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

367b. Repertory Dance Theatre IV (1/2)

Mr. Rooks, Ms. Tacon.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

394a. Advanced Modern Dance I (1/2)

Enlargement of, and more detailed study of, all previously learned material. More demanding études. Mr. Rooks, Ms. Tacon.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

395b. Advanced Modern Dance II (1/2)

Mr. Rooks, Ms. Tacon.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

396a. Advanced Modern Dance III (1/2)

Mr. Rooks, Ms. Tacon.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

397b. Advanced Modern Dance IV (1/2)

Mr. Rooks, Ms. Tacon.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Extracurricular: See General Information, p. 19.


Physical Education


I. Introductory

110. Introduction to Athletic Training (1)

This lecture and laboratory course exposes students to the techniques necessary both to prevent and also to recognize, treat, and rehabilitate common sports injuries. Anatomy and function of joints, spine, groin, and head and face injuries are studied. Laboratory and hands-on involvement in the field are required. 
Ms. Finerghty.

120a or b. Hiking and Backpacking (1/2)

This course is designed to expose the novice hiker/backpacker to the equipment
and techniques that are needed for the trail. It culminates in an extended trail experience. Mr. Sipperly.

125a and b. Beginning Golf I (1/2)

The course is intended to introduce the students to a basic playing knowledge of the game. It begins the development of the swing and adapts it to selected clubs. Emphasis is on swing practice and range hitting with limited opportunity for playing the course. Instructor to be announced.

126a and b. Beginning Golf II (1/2)

Continues the development of the basic stroke with selected clubs. More opportunity for playing the course emphasis continues to be on swing development and club control. Instructor to be announced.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

130a or b. Beginning Badminton (1/2)

Introduction to the basic overhead and underhand strokes and their use in game situations. Singles and doubles strategy and rules of the game. Designed for the student with no previous instruction in badminton. Mr. Barlow.

140a. Beginning Basketball (1/2)

This course develops individual skills (ball handling, shooting, passing, rebounding, and defense) as well as offensive and defensive strategies. Ms. Finerghty.

145a. Volleyball Fundamentals (1/2)

This course develops individual skills (passing, setting, spiking, and blocking) as well as offensive and defensive strategies. Mr. Penn.

150a and b. Beginning Swimming I (1/2)

The course is intended to develop a physical and mental adjustment to the water in students who have a fear of the water or little or no formal instruction. The course includes the practice of elementary skills applying principles of buoyancy, propulsion, and safety. Ms. Prater-Lee, Mr. Sipperly.

151a and b. Beginning Swimming II (1/2)

The course is designed for students who have the ability to float on front and back and who are comfortable in the water but have limited technical knowledge of strokes. Ms. Prater-Lee, Mr. Sipperly.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

190a and b. Fundamentals of Conditioning (1/2)

A course designed to give the student an understanding of fitness, its development and maintenance. Included are units on cardiovascular efficiency, muscle strength, endurance, flexibility, weight control, weight training, and relaxation techniques. The department.

191 a and b. Beginning Squash I (1/2)

An introduction to the basic shots of the game and their use. Introduces the rules and provides basic game situations. Assumes no previous experience or instruction in squash. Mr. Thorpe-Clark.

192 a and b. Beginning Squash II (1/2)

Further development of the basic shots and strategies of the game. Mr. Thorpe-Clark.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

193a and b. Beginning Tennis (1/2)

Introduction of the three basic strokes: forehand, backhand, and serve; rules of the game. Mr. Penn.

196a or b. Low Intermediate Tennis (1/2)

Continued work on basic strokes and tactics. Ms. Campbell.


II. Intermediate

225. Intermediate Golf I (1/2)

Expectation is that there is some technique with woods and irons and experience playing on a course. The student is put through a thorough analysis of basic swings and develops consistency and accuracy with all clubs. The student is expected to master history, rules of the game, etiquette, and all aspects of tournament play. 
Mr. Barlow.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

226. Intermediate Golf II (1/2)

A continuing development and refinement of all aspects of the game. Mr. Barlow.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

230b. Intermediate Badminton (1/2)

Review and further development of basic strokes and tactics. Instruction in advanced strokes and strategy for singles, doubles, and mixed doubles. Designed for the student with previous badminton experience. Ms. Campbell.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

241a or b. Intermediate Basketball (1/2)

Students are expected to master higher level individual skills of ball handling, shooting, passing, rebounding, and defense, making it possible to learn more complex team offensive and defensive theories and strategies, and to utilize these skills in game situations. Ms. Finerghty.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

245b. Intermediate Volleyball (1/2)

Students are expected to master higher levels of setting, spiking, serving, blocking, as well as more complex offensive and defensive strategies. Mr. Penn.

250a or b. Intermediate Swimming I (1/2)

Development of propulsive skill primarily through the use of basic stroke patterns: front and crawls, side and breast strokes. Includes introduction to skin diving. 
Ms. Prater-Lee.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

251a or b. Intermediate Swimming II (1/2)

Further development of strokes and skin diving techniques. Ms. Prater-Lee.

Prerequisite: completion of Physical Education 250 and/or permission of instructor.

298. Independent Work (1/2 or 1)

Permission granted by the chair of the department for the study of a topic in depth.


III. Advanced

378a or b. Advanced Swimming and Aquatic Conditioning (1/2)

This course teaches new, advanced swimming skills and refines previously learned swimming strokes and skills. The course introduces water fitness techniques and training through the activities of water running, water polo and competitive swimming and conditioning. Ms. Prater-Lee.

Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of the Intermediate course, the Red Cross Level V course, or the ability to perform the equivalent swimming skills.

379a or b. Lifeguard Training (1/2)

Fulfills the requirements for the Red Cross lifeguard training course. Provides additional instruction in stroke technique. Ms. Prater-Lee.

Prerequisites: proficiency in crawl, sidestroke, and breaststroke; ability to swim 500 yds. continuously. Permission of instructor.

Note: Additional fee is required to complete the Red Cross certification and to receive academic credit.

390b. Water Safety Instructor's Course (1)

Fulfills the requirements for the Red Cross instructor rating. Includes skill development, stroke analysis, learning progressions, class organization, and practice teaching. Prepares the student to teach basic and emergency water safety, infant and preschool aquatics, all levels of swimming. Ms. Prater-Lee.

Prerequisites: Advanced skill in swimming, Red Cross Lifeguard Training certification or Emergency Water Safety certification. Permission of the instructor.

Note: Additional fee is required to complete the Red Cross certification and to receive academic credit.

393a or b. Advanced Tennis (1/2)

Emphasis on advanced strokes, analysis of errors, tactics for singles and doubles. Mr. Czula.

Prerequisites: good ground strokes, serve, and volley; permission of the instructor.

Extracurricular: See General Information, page 19.