Art

Professors: Nicholas Adams, Eugene A. Carrollab, Frances D. Fergusson (and President), Susan D. Kuretsky; Associate Professors: Peter Charlap, Eve D'Ambrab, Peter Huenink, Karen Lucic, Brian Lukacher (Chair), Molly Nesbitb, Harry Roseman;Assistant Professor: Andrew WatskyabSenior Lecturer: Jeh Johnson; Lecturers:Francesca Consagra (Curator of Prints and Drawings, Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center), James Mundy (Director, Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center).

ab Absent on leave for the year. Absent on leave, second semester.

Requirements for Concentration in Art History: The major consists of a minimum of 12 units. 10 units, including Art 105-106, must be in graded art history courses taken at Vassar. 2 units may be taken in studio art and/or architectural design, or may be transferred from work completed outside of Vassar, such as courses taken Junior Year Abroad.

Distribution: 6 units must be divided equally between groups A, B, and C. 
1 unit in group D (African or Asian) may be substituted for a unit from any of the other three groups and 1 unit taken JYA may also be applied to meet this distribution requirement. 3 units must be in 300-level art history courses: two seminars in different art historical groups and 301 (senior project). 300-level seminars are to be selected on the basis of courses in the same area already taken on the 200-level. Majors are also urged to take a 300-level seminar before 301.

A) Ancient B) Renaissance C) Nineteenth Century D) Asian

A) Medieval B) Seventeenth C) Twentieth Century D) African

B) Century C) American

Departmental and interdisciplinary courses that do not conform to the groupings listed above may be applied to the distribution requirements upon approval of the student's major adviser.

Ungraded/NRO work may not be used to satisfy the requirements for the art history concentration.

Senior Year Requirements: Art 301 and 1 additional unit at the 300-level. Majors concentrating in art history are required to write a senior paper, based upon independent research and supervised by a member of the department. Petitions for exemption from this requirement, granted only in special circumstances, must be submitted to the chair in writing by the first day of classes in the A semester.

Recommendations: The selection and sequence of courses for the major should be planned closely with the major adviser. Students are advised to take courses in the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture, and are strongly encouraged to take at least one studio course. Students considering graduate study in art history are advised to take courses in foreign languages: German, and the Romance, Classical, or Asian languages, depending on areas of interest. Students with special interest in architectural design and/or city planning should meet with the departmental adviser to discuss this concentration.

The art department offers a correlate sequence in art history to allow students to develop an area of significant interest outside their major field of concentration. In consultation with a departmental adviser, the student will select a body of courses encompassing introductory through advanced study and covering more than one historical period.

The Correlate Sequence in Art History: 6 graded units including Art 105-106, three 200-level courses in at least two art historical period groups, and one 300-level course.

Advisers: the art history faculty.

Requirements for Concentration in Studio Art: 13 units; 4 units must be in graded art history courses, consisting of Art 105-106 and two 200-level courses in different groups (A, B, C, or D) listed above; 9 studio units, 7 of which must be graded units taken at Vassar, including Art 102-103; 4 units in 200-level studio courses, of which 2 must be Art 204-205 and 2 must be in sequential courses in painting, drawing, or printmaking; 3 units in 300-level studio courses including Art 301. By special permission up to 2 units of 298 and 399 work can be included in the major.

Senior Year Requirements: Art 301 and 1 additional unit at the 300-level.

Studio Art: Entrance into the studio concentration is determined by evaluation of the student's class work and by a review of the student's portfolio by the studio faculty. The portfolio may be submitted for evaluation at any time, ordinarily between the spring of the sophomore year and the spring of the junior year. Students taking studio courses are charged a fee to cover the cost of some materials, and they may be responsible for the purchase of additional materials.

Students who wish to concentrate in studio art are advised to take Art 102-103 in their freshman year and at least one additional studio course in the sophomore year in order to have a portfolio of work to be evaluated for admission to the studio art concentration. Those students interested in the studio concentration should consult the studio faculty no later than the end of the sophomore year. NRO work may not be used to satisfy the requirements for the studio concentration.

Advisers: the studio art faculty. 

Art History


I. Introductory

105a-106b. Introduction to the History of Art (1)

An historical and analytical introduction to architecture, sculpture, and painting. The department.

Open to all classes. Enrollment limited by class.

Three 50-minute periods and one conference hour.

170a. History of Architecture (1)

A survey of architecture from the earliest times to the present. Focusing on a major work or theme each week, the course will cover architecture and city-making in a historical context. Primary source readings and field trips. Mr. Adams.

Open to all classes.

[190a. Images and Ideas: Exploring the Sense of Sight] (1)

An exploration of how various notions of seeing (as perception, as recognition, as revelation) have been treated in the visual arts and in literature. Class meetings take place in the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center so that students may make regular use of Vassar's extensive art collection. Ms. Kuretsky.

Open to freshmen. Limited enrollment.

Two 75-minute periods.

Not offered in 1999/00. 


II. Intermediate

Prerequisite for intermediate courses: Art 105-106 except as noted.

[210b. Greek Art and Architecture] (1)

(Same as Classics 210). Sculpture, vase painting, and architecture from the Archaic and Classical periods, with glances back to the Bronze Age and forward to the Hellenistic kingdoms. Stylistic developments leading to the ideal types of hero, warrior, athlete, maiden, etc. are central to the course, along with the mythological subjects that glorified the citystate and marked religious cults and the rituals of everyday life. Ms. D'Ambra.

Prerequisite: Art 105106 or Classics 216 or 217, or by permission of instructor.

Not offered in 1999/00.

211a. Roman Art and Architecture (1)

(Same as Classics 211) Sculpture, painting, and architecture in the Roman Republic and Empire. Topics include: the appeal of Greek styles, the spread of artistic and architectural forms throughout the vast empire and its provinces, the role of art as political propaganda for state and as status symbols for private patrons. Ms. D'Ambra.

Prerequisite: Art 105106 or Classics 218 or 219, or by permission of instructor.

220a. Romanesque and Gothic Architecture (1)

A history of architecture from the revival of monumental building by the Carolingians in the north of Europe down to the age of the great cathedrals in the thirteenth century. While it is a survey of mostly church architecture, coverage extends to castles and cities. Topics explored include Benedictine monasticism and the legacy of Rome; materials and construction; design and structural innovations of Gothic in the Ile-de-France; the castle in war; the city as setting for cathedral builders. Readings focus on primary sources and recent monographs. Videos and computer animations. Mr. Huenink.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or Medieval Studies, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

221b. The Sacred Arts of the Middle Ages (1)

Sculpture, manuscript illumination, painting, and metalwork from the Carolingian through the Gothic period (800-1300). Focus is on formal and iconographic developments in their historical context. Readings focus on primary sources and writings on medieval aesthetics. Some work with Vassar's collections and New York museums. Mr. Huenink.

Prerequisites: Art 105, or Medieval Studies, or by permission of instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

230a. Northern Renaissance Painting (1)

Early Netherlandish and German painting and printmaking from Campin and van Eyck to Bruegel, Holbein, and Dürer. The course examines northern European attitudes toward nature, devotional art and portraiture that developed in the early fifteenth century and their evolution up to and through the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century. Ms. Kuretsky.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106.

Two 75minute periods.

231b. Dutch and Flemish Painting in the Seventeenth Century (1)

An exploration of the new forms of secular and religious art that developed during the socalled Golden Age of the Netherlands in the works of Rubens, Rembrandt, Vermeer and their contemporaries. The course examines the impact of differing religions on Flanders and the Dutch Republic, while exploring how political, economic and scientific factors encouraged the formation of seventeenth century Netherlandish art. Ms. Kuretsky.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106.

Two 75minute periods.

235a. Early Central Italian Painting and Sculpture (1)

The early Renaissance from Donatello and Masaccio to Botticelli, Leonardo and the young Michelangelo. Instructor to be announced.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106.

236b. Later Central Italian Painting and Sculpture (1)

Renaissance painting and sculpture from Leonardo and Raphael to the death of Michelangelo. Instructor to be announced.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106; Art 106 may be a corequisite.

242b. Seventeenth-Century Painting and Sculpture (1)
in Italy, France, and Spain

An examination of the dominant trends and figures of the Italian, French, and Spanish baroque period. This course explores the works of major masters including Caravaggio, Bernini, Poussin, La Tour, and Velazquez, as well as such issues as the development of illusionistic ceiling decoration, the theoretical basis of baroque art, and art's subservience to the church and the royal court. Instructor to be announced.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106.

250a. Inventing a Nation: Cultural Diversity in American Art (1)
from the Beginnings to 1865

This course examines the arts of the prehistoric, colonial, early republic, and antebellum periods. Important figures include painters such as Copley, West, Mount, Cole, and Church, and architects such as Jefferson, Bulfinch, Latrobe, Davis, and Downing. In addition, we consider the diverse and often overlooked contributions of women, Native Americans, African Americans, and folk artists. Ms. Lucic.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106.

251b. The Challege of Modernity: American Art 1865-1945 (1)

Painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, and design during America's "coming-of-age'' as a cultural, economic, and political power. The course examines the work of such figures as Richardson, Sullivan, Wright, Homer, Eakins, Cassatt, Sargent, Whistler, O'Keeffe, Hopper, Stieglitz, Strand, and the artists of the Harlem Renaissance. Ms. Lucic.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106.

253b. The Arts of Central, East and Southern Africa (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 253b.) A survey of the visual arts of Central, East, and Southern Africa, ancient to contemporary. Chronological examination of the development of politically centralized kingdoms. Examination of the art of presentday decentralized rural and nomadic peoples from Gabon to Ethiopia to South Africa, as well as contemporary urban art from this broad region. Looks at the impact of both Arab and European contact with African peoples from a historical perspective. Emphasizes relationships between the past and the present, the rural and the urban, and Africa and the African Diaspora throughout. Ms. Thompson.

Prerequisite: 105106, or one 200 level course in Africana Studies or by permission of instructor.

254a. The Arts of West and North Africa (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 254a.) A survey of the visual arts of West and North Africa, ancient to contemporary. Chronological examination of the art of ancient Nubia and Egypt, the empires of the Western Sudan, and the kingdoms of the Guinea Coast. Examination of the art of presentday decentralized rural and nomadic peoples from Morocco to Guinea to Cameron, as well as contemporary urban art of this broad region. Looks at the impact of both Arabic and European contact with peoples of Africa from a historical perspective. Emphasizes relationships between the past and the present, the rural and the urban, and Africa and the African Diaspora throughout. Ms. Thompson.

Prerequisites: Art 105-106, or one 200-level course in Africana Studies or by permission of instructor.

257a. The Arts of China (1)

A historical survey of the major developments in Chinese art from the Neolithic period through the Ch'ing dynasty, including archaeological discoveries, bronzes, ceramics, Buddhist sculpture, architecture, calligraphy, and painting. Instructor to be announced.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor.

Alternate years: Offered in 1999/00.

[258a. The Arts of Japan] (1)

A historical survey of the major developments in Japanese art from prehistoric times through the Edo period, including painting, sculpture, decorative arts, architecture, and garden design. Mr. Watsky.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor.

Alternate years: not offered in 1999/00.

[259b. Warriors, Deities and Tea Masters: Japanese Art of the (1)
Momoyama Period (15681615)]

A survey of the arts during this brief yet pivotal period, when artists and patrons in a newly redefined Japan explored severaloften contrastingaesthetic ideals. The course examines developments in a range of media, including painting, architecture, ceramics, and lacquer. Some of the themes treated are the tea ceremony, the first arrival of Europeans, the workshop in Japanese art, and genre. Mr. Watsky.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or by permission of instructor.

Not offered in 1999/00.

[260b. Mirrors of Emperors, Vehicles of Pleasure: Japanese Art (1)
of the Edo Period (16151868)]

A survey of the arts of this long period under warrior rule. The role of the arts for the warrior rulers are examined. This is a period when a newly affluent merchant class emerged as significant patrons of the arts. The course examines developments in a range of media, including painting, architecture, ceramics, and lacquer. Mr. Watsky.

Prerequisite: Art 105106, or by permission instructor.

Not offered in 1999/00.

262a. The Art of the First Half of the Nineteenth Century (1)

A survey of major movements and figures in European art, 1789-1848, focusing on such issues as the contemporaneity of antiquity in revolutionary history painting, the eclipse of mythological and religious art by an art of social observation and political commentary, the romantic cult of genius, imagination, and creative self-definition, and the emergence of landscape painting in an industrializing culture. Mr. Lukacher.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106.

263b. The Art of the Second Half of the Nineteenth Century (1)

A survey of major movements and figures in European art, 1848-1900, examining the realist, impressionist, and symbolist challenges to the dominant art institutions, aesthetic assumptions, and social values of the period; also addressing how a critique of modernity and a sociology of aesthetics can be seen developing through these phases of artistic experimentation. Mr. Lukacher.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106.

264a. The Avant-Gardes, 1890-1930 (1)

The formation of the European avant-gardes is studied as part of the general modernization of everyday life. Various media are included: painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, the applied arts, and film. Ms. Nesbit.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106.

[265b. Modernism and the Mass Media, 1930-1975] (1)

The history of modernist painting in Europe and America from 1930 to 1975, together with those contemporary developments in film, photography, and the mass media. Special attention is paid to the criticism, theory, and politics of the image. Ms. Nesbit.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106.

Not offered in 1999/00.

[270a. Renaissance Architecture] (1)

European architecture and city building from 1300-1500; focus is on Italian architecture and Italian architects; encounters between Italian and other cultures throughout Europe and the Mediterranean. Mr. Adams.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or 170 or by permission of instructor.

Not offered in 1999/00.

[271b. Early Modern Architecture] (1)

European and American architecture and city building (1500-1800). Focus is on the development and transformation of Renaissance ideas through their diffusion through Europe and the Mediterranean and their encounter with new exigencies in the Americas. Mr. Adams.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or 170, or by permission of instructor.

Not offered in 1999/00.

[272a. Modern Architecture] (l)

European and American architecture and city building (1800-1930) from the Industrial Revolution to World War II; emphasis on the development of modernism in the work of Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, and Frank Lloyd Wright. Mr. Adams.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or 170, or by permission of instructor.

Not offered in 1999/00.

273b. Architecture After Modernism (1)

European and American architecture and city building (1930-present); examination of the diffusion of modernism and its reinterpretation by corporate America and Soviet Russia. Discussion of the critiques of modernism (postmodernism, deconstruction). Issues in contemporary architecture. Mr. Adams.

Prerequisite: Art 105-106, or 170, or by permission of instructor.

282a. Survey of AfricanAmerican Arts (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 282) This class serves as an introduction to the artistic production of African Americans in the U.S. from the colonial period to the present day. As a class, we examine the multiple influences on (African, European, American, etc.) and uses for black creative expression. Working with an expansive conception of art, we pay close attention to the work of formally and non-formally trained artists in relation to their social, historical, and aesthetic contexts. Ms. Collins.

Prerequisite: Art 105106 or by permission of instructor.

290a or b. Field Work (1/2 or 1)

Projects undertaken in cooperation with approved galleries, archives, collections, or other agencies concerned with the visual arts, including architecture. May be taken either semester or in the summer. Open by permission of a supervising instructor. Not included in the minimum requirements for the major. The department.

Prerequisites: Art 105-106 and one 200-level course.

298a or b. Independent Work (1/2 or 1)

Open by permission of the instructor with the concurrence of the adviser in the field of concentration. Not included in the minimum for the major. 


III. Advanced

Prerequisite for advanced courses: 3 units of 200-level work or the equivalent. By permission.

300 a or b. Senior Paper Preparation (1/2)

Optional. Regular meetings with a faculty member to prepare an annotated bibliography and thesis statement for the senior paper. Course must be scheduled in the semester prior to the writing of the senior paper. Credit given only upon completion of the senior paper. Ungraded.

301a or b. Senior Project (1)

Supervised independent research culminating in a written paper.

[310b. Seminar in Ancient Art] (1)

(Same as Classics 310b.) Portraiture. A study of portrait sculpture of Hellenistic rulers, Roman Republican dynasts, and emperors with emphasis on the political roles of the imagery. Topics include the question of the representation of individuals versus types (the warrior, statesman, etc.), the funerary functions of portraits and their significance in preserving memory. Special consideration is given to portraits of those less visible in ancient society (women, children, and members of the lower social orders). Ms. D'Ambra.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 2-hour period.

Not offered in 1999/00.

320b. Seminar in Medieval Art (1)

The Romanesque church of the Magdalene at Vézelay. An investigation of the architectural and sculptural programs of the abbey church, and a close reading of the Vezelay Chronicle, written at Vézelay c. 1138-1161. Clerical passions, comital raids, massing of pilgrims, theft of relics, communal violenceall seen through the lens of the Chronicleset the historical backdrop. Mr. Huenink.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

330a. Seminar in Baroque Art (1)

Topic and instructor to be announced.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 2-hour period.

331a. Seminar in Northern Art (1)

Sight and Insight in the Age of Observation. An exploration of the Dutch fascination with vision and visuality. The seminar examines sources of this preoccupation in van Eyck, Bruegel, and Durer and its later manifestation in seventeenth century art and thought. Among other topics: the influence of the camera obscura on Vermeer and his contemporaries, Rembrandt's narratives involving sight or blindness, and the relationship between Dutch still life painting and botanical illustration. Ms. Kuretsky.

Prerequisite: Special permission.

One 2 hour period.

332b. Seminar in Italian Renaissance Art (1)

Instructor and subject to be announced.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 2-hour period.

358b. Seminar in Asian Art (1)

Topic and instructor to be announced.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 2-hour period.

362b. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Art (1)

(Same as Art/Anthropology 384b.)

364a. Seminar in TwentiethCentury Art (1)

The World Picture. The seminar studies the contemporary culture as a global condition. That there is no consensus on this culture's definition enables us to explore different critical possibilities, focusing on the concepts provided by Deleuze. Students write seminar papers on the cross-cultural work of contemporary artists, filmmakers, and architects (for example, Matthew Barney, Gabriel Orozco, Rem Koolhaas, Chris Marker, Pina Bausch, Rachel Whiteread, William Kentridge, Jean Nouvel, Gary Hill, Bill Viola, Mona Hatoum, Peter Eisenman, Gerhard Richter). Ms. Nesbit.

Prerequisite: Art 265, or by permission of instructor.

One 2hour session.

370b. Seminar in Architectural History (1)

(Same as Philosophy 370b.) Philosophy and Architecture at the Millennium. The significance of architectural metaphors such as ground, construction, edifice, and foundation within the Western metaphysical tradition as well as the philosophical statements articulated by twentieth century architecture. These parallel lines of inquiry will travel through a number of theoretical stationsmodernity and postmodernity, foundationalism and antifoundationalism, deconstruction and poststructuralismtrying to provide both a remapping and a critical assessment of philosophy and architecture at the millennium. (Readings/Buildings by Eisenman, Tschumi, Gehry, Koolhaas, Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Derrida, Deleuze.) Class registration is divided between art and philosophy majors. Giovanna Borradori and Nicholas Adams.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructors.

One 2hour period.

378b. Seminar in Museum History, Philosophy, and Practice (1)

This seminar addresses issues surrounding the role and mission of the art museum in society. By highlighting each year a specific topic regarding history, ethics, connoisseurship, economic, or social issues, this course attempts to clarify the purpose of presenting the public with original works of art and the methods that invest this exposure with meaning. Working with original works of art is stressed.

Topic for 1999/00: The Museum Collection as a Social and Political Statement. An historical view of the museum as communicator of values of a particular time and place from the founding of the Louvre in the eighteenth century to Vassar's collection in the present day. Mr. Mundy.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor; 3 units of 200-level art history.

Enrollment limited.

380a. Seminar in the History of Printmaking (1)

History of the Print in Western Europe, 14801830. Students learn the primary elements of connoisseurship by studying original works of art in the important and comprehensive print collections at the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center. They also investigate the industry of making and selling prints in both northern and southern Europe as a means to understand better the evolution of media and styles during this period of 350 years. Ms. Consagra.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 2hour period.

381b. Creativity and Politics in the Harlem Renaissance and the WPA (1)

(Same as Africana Studies 381b) Focusing on the experiences and representations of African Americans in the U.S., this seminar examines the arts, institutions, and ideas of the Harlem Renaissance of the twenties and New Deal projects of the thirties and forties. Analyzing sculpture, photographs, paintings, literature, "folk" arts, murals, illustrations, manifestos, performances, and various systems of patronage, we explore relationships between art, politics, and society. Cultural workers we investigate include: Meta Warrick Fuller, Alain Locke, W.E.B. Du Bois, Winold Reiss, Nella Larsen, Aaron Douglas, Josephine Baker, Archibald Motley, Doris Ulmann, James VanDerZee, Elizabeth Catlett, Jacob Lawrence, William Edmondson, and FSA photographers. Ms. Collins.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

One 2hour session.

384a. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Art (1)

(Same as Anthropology 384) The Archive, the Museum, and the Ruin: Conserving the Past in Modern Europe. Ranging from the archive to the monument, from the tableau d'histoire to the newspaper illustration, from the private museum to the universal exposition, this course examines how the historical past is reconstructed, represented and given visual form as an object of knowledge during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. With focus on the metropolitan cultures of Paris and London, the art historical component of this course is concerned with different formations of museological and commemorative space (poetic antiquarian, natural historical, national collective), the inversion and mutability of the genres in the nineteenth century French and English art (history painting as genre painting, contemporary reportage as history painting), and the endurance of the cult of ruins from the romantic into the postmodern periods. Mr. Lukacher and Ms. Goldstein

Prerequisite: permission of instructors.

One 2-hour session.

385b. Seminar in American Art (1)

(Same as American Culture 385b). Designing Nature: Landscape Painting, Literature, and Gardens in Antebellum America. This seminar examines the vital concern for picturesque landscapeboth actual and fictivein American arts of the early nineteenth century. The course investigates the relationship of important innovators in landscape design, such as Downing, to the literary and artistic works of Cole, Durand, Irving, Emerson, Thoreau, and others. We also explore the continuing impact of antebellum landscape traditions at several representative sites in the Hudson River Valley. Ms. Lucic, Mr. Peck.

Prerequisite: permission of instructors.

One 2hour session.

399a or b. Senior Independent Work (1/2 or 1)

Open by permission of the instructor with the concurrence of the department adviser in the field of concentration. Not included in the minimum for the major.

Studio Work in Design, Drawing, Painting, Sculpture


I. Introductory

102a-103b. Basic Drawing (1)

Development of visual ideas through drawing. Line, shape, value, form, and texture are investigated through specific problems in a variety of media. Mr. Charlap; other instructors to be announced.

Open to all classes.

Two 2-hour periods.

[108b. Color] (1)

To develop students' understanding of color as a phenomenon and its role in art. Color theories are discussed and students solve problems to investigate color interactions using collage and paint. Mr. Charlap.

Open to all classes.

Not offered in 1999/00. 


II. Intermediate

Prerequisites for intermediate courses: Art 102a-103b or by permission of instructor.

202a-203b. Painting I (1)

Basic painting skills are explored through a sequence of specific problems involving landscape, still life, and the figure. Instruction in the use of various painting media. Mr. Charlap.

Two 2-hour periods.

204a-205b. Sculpture I (1)

Introduction to the language of three-dimensional form through a sequence of specific problems which involve the use of various materials. Mr. Roseman.

Two 2-hour periods.

206a, 207b. Drawing (1)

Intensive study of the figure with emphasis on establishing and pursuing a drawing idea. Study from life as well as the imagination with work from both still life and landscape. Mr. Roseman, Mr. Charlap.

Prerequisite: Art 102a.

Two 2-hour periods.

208a. Printmaking: Introduction (1)

A variety of printmaking concepts and procedures are explored through a series of assignments in monotype and collagraph. Instructor to be announced.

Corequisite: Art 102a.

Two 2-hour periods.

209b. Printmaking: Intaglio (1)

The intaglio techniques of line etching, aquatint, and drypoint, as well as their variations, are applied to making both black and white and color prints. Instructor to be announced.

Prerequisite: Art 102a or by permission of instructor.

Two 2-hour periods.

Alternate years.

212b. Photography (1)

In this course students investigate technical, visual and expressive aspects of black and white photography. Technical aspects of shooting and darkroom procedures are taught building on previous experience. The course includes group and individual critiques to develop the students analytical abilities. All students enrolled in this course are required to join Focus (student photography organization) in order to gain darkroom access. Students are expected to supply their own camera and printing paper. Instructor to be announced.

Prerequisites: Basic Drawing and one other Art Department course or by permission of instructor. A photography portfolio is required.

298a or b. Independent Study (1/2 or 1)

Open by permission of the instructor with the concurrence of the adviser in the field of concentration. Not included in the minimum for the major except by special permission. Mr. Charlap, Mr. Roseman, other instructors to be announced. 


III. Advanced

Prerequisites for advanced courses: 2 units of 200-level work and as noted.

301a or b. Senior Project (1)

A supervised independent project in studio art.

302a, 303b. Painting II (1)

Intensive study of the human figure with an emphasis on color and compositional ideas. Students will have an opportunity to establish themes which they will pursue. Instructor to be announced

Prerequisite: Art 202a-203b.

Two 2-hour periods.

304a, 305b. Sculpture II (1)

The first semester is devoted to intensive study of the human figure. An exploration into the perceptual and conceptual pursuits of creating sculpture is the focus of the second semester. Mr. Roseman.

Prerequisite: Art 204a-205b or by permission of instructor.

Two 2-hour periods.

399a or b. Senior Independent Study (1/or 1)

Open by permission of the instructor with the concurrence of the department adviser in the field of concentration. Not included in the minimum for the major except by special permission. Mr. Charlap, Mr. Roseman, other instructors to be announced. 


Studio Work in Architectural Design

275/276. Architectural Drawing (1)

Elements of architectural drawing including orthographic, isometric, and perspective projection. Mr. Johnson.

Special permission. Does not count toward the major.

Prerequisite: Art 105106; corequisite: one of the following 200level architectural history courses: 220, 270, 272, or 273.

Two 2hour periods.

375/376. Architectural Design (1)

Theory and practice of contemporary design. Mr. Johnson.

Special permission.

Prerequisites: Art 275/276, and one of the following 200level architectural history courses: Art 220, 270, 271, 272, or 273. Corequisite: a second 200 level architectural history course: Art 220, 270, 271, 272, or 273.

Two 2hour periods.